IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/inm/ormsom/v7y2005i2p152-168.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Decentralized Serial Supply Chains Subject to Order Delays and Information Distortion: Exploiting Real-Time Sales Data

Author

Listed:
  • Noel Watson

    () (Harvard Business School, Soldiers Field Road, Boston, Massachusetts 02163)

  • Yu-Sheng Zheng

    () (Operations and Information Management Department, The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, and Cheung Kong Graduate School of Business, China)

Abstract

Decentralized supply chains are traditionally order focused: stage managers focus on meeting replenishment orders of downstream stages; market demand information is relayed up through these orders, and therefore is subject to costly delay and distortion. This paper shows that sharing real-time sales data across all stages and a change in focus to meeting customer demand can mitigate performance impairment caused by the order focus. We show that a change of managerial focus in a decentralized chain can be made by measuring stages' performance based on their respective echelon stocks, which only depends on how well they respond to the market demand. A demand-focused measurement scheme can be made incentive compatible with the knowledge of the demand distribution; a heuristic scheme independent of the demand distribution can be used to achieve near incentive compatibility.

Suggested Citation

  • Noel Watson & Yu-Sheng Zheng, 2005. "Decentralized Serial Supply Chains Subject to Order Delays and Information Distortion: Exploiting Real-Time Sales Data," Manufacturing & Service Operations Management, INFORMS, vol. 7(2), pages 152-168, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:inm:ormsom:v:7:y:2005:i:2:p:152-168
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/msom.1050.0074
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Kevin H. Shang & Jing-Sheng Song, 2003. "Newsvendor Bounds and Heuristic for Optimal Policies in Serial Supply Chains," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 49(5), pages 618-638, May.
    2. Fangruo Chen & Yu-Sheng Zheng, 1994. "Lower Bounds for Multi-Echelon Stochastic Inventory Systems," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 40(11), pages 1426-1443, November.
    3. Fangruo Chen, 1999. "Decentralized Supply Chains Subject to Information Delays," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 45(8), pages 1076-1090, August.
    4. Remus, William & O'Connor, Marcus & Griggs, Kenneth, 1995. "Does reliable information improve the accuracy of judgmental forecasts?," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 11(2), pages 285-293, June.
    5. Hau Lee & Seungjin Whang, 1999. "Decentralized Multi-Echelon Supply Chains: Incentives and Information," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 45(5), pages 633-640, May.
    6. Andrew J. Clark & Herbert Scarf, 2004. "Optimal Policies for a Multi-Echelon Inventory Problem," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 50(12_supple), pages 1782-1790, December.
    7. Joel H. Steckel & Sunil Gupta & Anirvan Banerji, 2004. "Supply Chain Decision Making: Will Shorter Cycle Times and Shared Point-of-Sale Information Necessarily Help?," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 50(4), pages 458-464, April.
    8. John D. Sterman, 1989. "Modeling Managerial Behavior: Misperceptions of Feedback in a Dynamic Decision Making Experiment," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 35(3), pages 321-339, March.
    9. Krishnan S. Anand & Haim Mendelson, 1997. "Information and Organization for Horizontal Multimarket Coordination," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 43(12), pages 1609-1627, December.
    10. O'Connor, Marcus & Remus, William & Griggs, Ken, 1993. "Judgemental forecasting in times of change," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 9(2), pages 163-172, August.
    11. GĂ©rard P. Cachon & Paul H. Zipkin, 1999. "Competitive and Cooperative Inventory Policies in a Two-Stage Supply Chain," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 45(7), pages 936-953, July.
    12. Hau L. Lee & V. Padmanabhan & Seungjin Whang, 1997. "Information Distortion in a Supply Chain: The Bullwhip Effect," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 43(4), pages 546-558, April.
    13. Rema Hariharan & Paul Zipkin, 1995. "Customer-Order Information, Leadtimes, and Inventories," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 41(10), pages 1599-1607, October.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Hoberg, Kai & Thonemann, Ulrich W., 2014. "Modeling and analyzing information delays in supply chains using transfer functions," International Journal of Production Economics, Elsevier, vol. 156(C), pages 132-145.
    2. Ryu, Seung-Jin & Tsukishima, Takahiro & Onari, Hisashi, 2009. "A study on evaluation of demand information-sharing methods in supply chain," International Journal of Production Economics, Elsevier, vol. 120(1), pages 162-175, July.
    3. Oliveira, Fernando S. & Ruiz, Carlos & Conejo, Antonio J., 2013. "Contract design and supply chain coordination in the electricity industry," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 227(3), pages 527-537.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:inm:ormsom:v:7:y:2005:i:2:p:152-168. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Mirko Janc). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/inforea.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.