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Using Charity Performance Metrics as an Excuse Not to Give

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  • Christine L. Exley

    () (Negotiation, Organizations & Markets Unit, Harvard Business School, Boston, Massachusetts 02163)

Abstract

There is an increasing pressure to give more wisely and effectively. There is, relatedly, an increasing focus on charity performance metrics. Through a series of experiments, this paper provides a caution to such a focus. Although information on charity performance metrics may facilitate more effective giving, it may also facilitate the development of excuses not to give. Managers of nonprofit organizations should carefully assess this tension when determining whether and how to provide information on their performance metrics.

Suggested Citation

  • Christine L. Exley, 2020. "Using Charity Performance Metrics as an Excuse Not to Give," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 66(2), pages 553-563, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:inm:ormnsc:v:66:y:2020:i:2:p:553-563
    DOI: 10.1287/mnsc.2018.3268
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    File URL: https://doi.org/10.1287/mnsc.2018.3268
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Björn Bartling & Vanessa Valero & Roberto A. Weber & Lan Yao, 2020. "Public discourse and socially responsible market behavior," ECON - Working Papers 359, Department of Economics - University of Zurich.
    2. Björn Bartling & Vanessa Valero & Roberto A. Weber & Yao Lan, 2020. "Public Discourse and Socially Responsible Market Behavior," CESifo Working Paper Series 8531, CESifo.

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