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The Relative earnings of young Mexican, black, and white women

  • Heather Antecol
  • Kelly Bedard

This analysis of data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth indicates that young Mexican women and young black women earned, respectively, 9.5% and 13.2% less than young white women in 1994. Differences in education appear to be the most important explanation for the Mexican-white wage gap, whereas differences in labor force attachment are the most important determinant of the black-white wage gap. The authors show that accounting for actual labor market experience, rather than simply imputing experience based on years since leaving school, is crucially important in such analyses. (Author's abstract.)

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Article provided by ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School in its journal ILR Review.

Volume (Year): 56 (2002)
Issue (Month): 1 (October)
Pages: 122-135

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Handle: RePEc:ilr:articl:v:56:y:2002:i:1:p:122-135
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  1. Trejo, Stephen, 2001. "Intergenerational Progress of Mexican-Origin Workers in the U.S. Labor Market," IZA Discussion Papers 377, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Ronald Oaxaca, 1971. "Male-Female Wage Differentials in Urban Labor Markets," Working Papers 396, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
  3. Mora, Marie T & Davila, Alberto, 1998. "Gender, Earnings, and the English Skill Acquisition of Hispanic Workers in the United States," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 36(4), pages 631-44, October.
  4. Sanders Korenman & David Neumark, 1992. "Marriage, Motherhood, and Wages," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 27(2), pages 233-255.
  5. Moon-Kak Kim & Solomon W. Polachek, 1994. "Panel Estimates of Male-Female Earnings Functions," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 29(2), pages 406-428.
  6. Phipps, S.A. & Burton, P. & Lethbridge, L., 1998. "In and Out of the Labour Market: Long-Term Income Consequences of Interruptions in Paid Work," Department of Economics at Dalhousie University working papers archive 98-03, Dalhousie, Department of Economics.
  7. Trejo, Stephen J, 1997. "Why Do Mexican Americans Earn Low Wages?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 105(6), pages 1235-68, December.
  8. Moffitt, Robert, 1992. "Incentive Effects of the U.S. Welfare System: A Review," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 30(1), pages 1-61, March.
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