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Trade unions and training practices in British workplaces

  • Francis Green
  • Stephen Machin
  • David Wilkinson

The authors use British establishment-level data from the 1991 Employers' Manpower and Skills Practices Survey (EMSPS) and individual-level data from the Autumn 1993 Quarterly Labour Force Survey (QLFS) to investigate the links between training provision and workplace unionization. Both the probability of receiving training and the amount of training received are found to have been substantially higher in unionized than in nonunion workplaces. The authors view these results as showing that trade unions can play an important role in developing and boosting skill formation in Britain. (Abstract courtesy JSTOR.)

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Article provided by ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School in its journal ILR Review.

Volume (Year): 52 (1999)
Issue (Month): 2 (January)
Pages: 179-195

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Handle: RePEc:ilr:articl:v:52:y:1999:i:2:p:179-195
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References listed on IDEAS
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  1. Machin, Stephen & Stewart, Mark B & Van Reenen, John, 1993. " The Economic Effects of Multiple Unionism: Evidence from the 1984 Workplace Industrial Relations Survey," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 95(3), pages 279-96.
  2. Stewart, Mark B, 1986. "Collective Bargaining Arrangements Closed Shops and Relative Pay," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 273, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
  3. Greenhalgh, C. & Mavrotas, G., 1992. "The Role of Career Aspirations and Financial Constraints in Individual Access to Vocational Training," Economics Series Working Papers 99136, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  4. Duncan, Greg J & Stafford, Frank P, 1980. "Do Union Members Receive Compensating Wage Differentials?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 70(3), pages 355-71, June.
  5. Machin, Stephen & Stewart, Mark, 1996. "Trade Unions and Financial Performance," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 48(2), pages 213-41, April.
  6. Metcalf, David, 1991. "British Unions: Dissolution or Resurgence?," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 7(1), pages 18-32, Spring.
  7. Green, Francis, 1993. "The Determinants of Training of Male and Female Employees in Britain," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 55(1), pages 103-22, February.
  8. repec:sae:niesru:v:140:y::i:1:p:45-63 is not listed on IDEAS
  9. Lynch, Lisa M, 1992. "Private-Sector Training and the Earnings of Young Workers," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(1), pages 299-312, March.
  10. Booth, Alison L, 1991. "Job-Related Formal Training: Who Receives It and What Is It Worth?," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 53(3), pages 281-94, August.
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