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The Effects of Information Asymmetry and Government Size on Happiness: A Case Study from Japan

Listed author(s):
  • Eiji Yamamura

This paper uses individual-level data from Japan (2003) to examine the effects of government size and the disclosure of official government information on happiness. The major findings are as follows: (1) Disclosure of official information is positively associated with the happiness of workers, but not with that of non-workers; and (2) Government size has a positive effect on the happiness of non-workers, but not with that of workers. It is, therefore, found that information asymmetry between government and citizens reduces the happiness of those who bear the cost of public service but does not affect the happiness of public service beneficiaries.

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Article provided by IUP Publications in its journal The IUP Journal of Governance and Public Policy.

Volume (Year): VII (2012)
Issue (Month): 1 (March)
Pages: 7-20

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Handle: RePEc:icf:icfjgp:v:07:y:2012:i:1:p:7-20
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  16. Simon Luechinger & Stephan Meier & Alois Stutzer, 2006. "Bureaucratic Rents and Life Satisfaction," IEW - Working Papers 269, Institute for Empirical Research in Economics - University of Zurich.
  17. Helliwell, John F., 2003. "How's life? Combining individual and national variables to explain subjective well-being," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 20(2), pages 331-360, March.
  18. Easterlin, Richard A., 1995. "Will raising the incomes of all increase the happiness of all?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 35-47, June.
  19. Scoppa Vincenzo & Ponzo Michela, 2008. "An Empirical Study of Happiness in Italy," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 8(1), pages 1-23, June.
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