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Achieving Good Governance through E-Governance: An Empirical Study of Orissa


  • Santap Sanhari Mishra


Good governance is the ultimate goal of any state. This was highlighted by the World Bank in recent times and multifarious discussions have been made on the concept. Development planners, statesmen and academicians across the world have accepted that e-governance is a viable method for achieving good governance. In an emerging economy like India, e-governance practices are flaring up. But is there any progress towards good governance? This was studied by conducting an attitudinal survey in the state of Orissa, where a plethora of ambitious initiatives like e-Sishu, e-Panchayati Raj, Bhulekh, etc. have been taken up. The survey observes that progress has been made in the governance of the state, but there are still miles to go. The article ends with some suggestions for further improvement.

Suggested Citation

  • Santap Sanhari Mishra, 2010. "Achieving Good Governance through E-Governance: An Empirical Study of Orissa," The IUP Journal of Governance and Public Policy, IUP Publications, vol. 0(3), pages 45-60, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:icf:icfjgp:v:05:y:2010:i:3:p:45-60

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    References listed on IDEAS

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