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Heterogeneity in the cyclical sensitivity of job-to-job flows

  • Schaffner, Sandra

"Scarce empirical evidence exists for Germany regarding the cyclical aspects of worker reallocation. Furthermore, it is assumed that the cyclical influence on transition rates is the same for all demographic groups. However, one can expect that each subgroup is differentially influenced by the same cycle. Therefore, we emphasize the heterogeneity of cyclical influences for different subgroups of workers, defined by age, gender and skills, and focus on job-to-job transitions which are, in fact, found to be the largest flows in the German labor market. The findings suggest that job-to-job transitions are procyclical. The empirical framework employed here allows demographic groups to vary in their cyclical sensitivity. Female and unskilled workers experience more pronounced swings than the core group of medium-skilled, medium-aged men. By contrast, the job-to-job transition rates of high-skilled workers, old workers, as well as young workers are less influenced by cyclical behavior." (Author's abstract, IAB-Doku) ((en))

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Article provided by Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany] in its journal Zeitschrift für ArbeitsmarktForschung – Journal for Labour Market Research.

Volume (Year): 43 (2011)
Issue (Month): 4 ()
Pages: 263-275

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Handle: RePEc:iab:iabzaf:v:2011:i:4:p:263-275
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  1. Ronald Bachmann, 2005. "Labour Market Dynamics in Germany: Hirings, Separations, and Job-to-Job Transitions over the Business Cycle," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2005-045, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.
  2. Burda, Michael C & Wyplosz, Charles, 1993. "Gross Worker and Job Flows in Europe," CEPR Discussion Papers 868, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. Christoph Schmidt, 2000. "The heterogeneity and cyclical sensitivity of unemployment : and exploration of German labour market flows ; the European unemployment problem," CESifo Forum, Ifo Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 1(1), pages 17-20, October.
  4. Bruce Fallick & Charles A. Fleischman, 2004. "Employer-to-employer flows in the U.S. labor market: the complete picture of gross worker flows," Finance and Economics Discussion Series 2004-34, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  5. repec:rwi:repape:0139 is not listed on IDEAS
  6. Kluve, Jochen & Schaffner, Sandra & Schmidt, Christoph M., 2006. "Labor Force Status Dynamics in the German Labor Market: Individual Heterogeneity and Cyclical Sensitivity," Technical Reports 2006,20, Technische Universität Dortmund, Sonderforschungsbereich 475: Komplexitätsreduktion in multivariaten Datenstrukturen.
  7. Eran Yashiv, 2008. "U.S. Labor Market Dynamics Revisited," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 109(4), pages 779-806, 03.
  8. Boris Hirsch & Thorsten Schank & Claus Schnabel, 2010. "Differences in Labor Supply to Monopsonistic Firms and the Gender Pay Gap: An Empirical Analysis Using Linked Employer-Employee Data from Germany," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 28(2), pages 291-330, 04.
  9. Royalty, Anne Beeson, 1998. "Job-to-Job and Job-to-Nonemployment Turnover by Gender and Education Level," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 16(2), pages 392-443, April.
  10. Mortensen, Dale T & Pissarides, Christopher A, 1994. "Job Creation and Job Destruction in the Theory of Unemployment," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 61(3), pages 397-415, July.
  11. Yashiv, Eran, 2006. "U.S. Labor Market Dynamics Revisited," IZA Discussion Papers 2455, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  12. Robert Shimer, 2005. "The cyclicality of hires, separations, and job-to-job transitions," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Jul, pages 493-508.
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