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The human capital selection of young males seeking asylum in Germany

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  • Lange, Martin
  • Pfeiffer, Friedhelm

Abstract

"This study analyses the selection of a sample of 203 young male asylum seekers from Middle Eastern and African countries that recently arrived in Germany. The findings suggest that, on average, asylum seekers in our sample have 22% more years of schooling - the indicator used for human capital - when compared to same-aged males from their country of origin. In addition, the analysis suggests that asylum seekers in the sample often accumulated rather low or relatively high levels of schooling compared to same-aged males in their countries of origin. This phenomenon is even more pronounced for parental education. It is demonstrated that individual human capital influences short-run integration outcomes in Germany. The paper discusses potential economic explanations for the findings on immigrant selection and integration outcomes." (Author's abstract, © Springer-Verlag) ((en))

Suggested Citation

  • Lange, Martin & Pfeiffer, Friedhelm, 2019. "The human capital selection of young males seeking asylum in Germany," Journal for Labour Market Research, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany], vol. 53(1), pages .8(1-14).
  • Handle: RePEc:iab:iabjlr:v:53:i:1:p:art.8,14
    DOI: 10.1186/s12651-019-0259-y
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    Cited by:

    1. Michael Hebsaker & Guido Neidhöfer & Friedhelm Pfeiffer, 2021. "Intergenerational mobility and self-selection on unobserved skills: New evidence," Journal for Labour Market Research, Springer;Institute for Employment Research/ Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), vol. 55(1), pages 1-9, December.
    2. Kolb, Michael & Neidhöfer, Guido & Pfeiffer, Friedhelm, 2019. "Intergenerational mobility and self-selection of asylum seekers in Germany," ZEW Discussion Papers 19-027, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research.
    3. Lucas Guichard, 2020. "Self-selection of Asylum Seekers: Evidence From Germany," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 57(3), pages 1089-1116, June.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Asylbewerber; ausländische Männer; Humankapital; Bildungsniveau; Bildungsabschluss; Schulabschluss; Herkunftsland; soziale Herkunft; berufliche Integration; Flüchtlinge; Heidelberg; Baden-Württemberg; Bundesrepublik Deutschland;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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