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Economic cycle and deceleration of female labor force participation in Latin America

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  • Serrano, Joaquín
  • Gasparini, Leonardo
  • Marchionni, Mariana
  • Glüzmann, Pablo

Abstract

"We study the behavior of female labor force participation (LFP) over the business cycle by estimating fixed effects models at the country and population-group level, using data from harmonized national household surveys of 18 Latin American countries in the period 1987 - 2014. We find that female LFP follows a countercyclical pattern - especially in the case of married, with children and vulnerable women - which suggests the existence of an inverse added-worker effect. We argue that this factor may have contributed to the deceleration in female labor supply in Latin America that took place in the 2000s, a decade of unusual high economic growth." (Author's abstract, © Springer-Verlag) ((en))

Suggested Citation

  • Serrano, Joaquín & Gasparini, Leonardo & Marchionni, Mariana & Glüzmann, Pablo, 2019. "Economic cycle and deceleration of female labor force participation in Latin America," Journal for Labour Market Research, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany], vol. 53(1), pages .13(1-21).
  • Handle: RePEc:iab:iabjlr:v:53:i:1:p:art.13,21
    DOI: 10.1186/s12651-019-0263-2
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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12651-019-0263-2
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    Cited by:

    1. Matías Ciaschi, 2020. "Job loss and household labor supply adjustments in developing countries: Evidence from Argentina," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0271, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Frauenerwerbstätigkeit; Konjunkturabhängigkeit; Erwerbsbeteiligung - internationaler Vergleich; Frauen; Ehefrauen; Mütter; Konjunkturaufschwung; Rezession; Lateinamerika; Argentinien; Bolivien; Brasilien; Chile; Kolumbien; Costa Rica; Dominikanische Republik; Ekuador; El Salvador; Guatemala; Honduras; Mexiko; Nicaragua; Panama; Paraguay; Peru; Uruguay; Venezuela;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • N3 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy

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