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The impact of welfare to work on parents and their children

Author

Listed:
  • Michelle Brady

    () (University of Queensland)

  • Kay Cook

    (RMIT University)

Abstract

When Welfare to Work activities for single parents were first introduced in the 2005 Commonwealth Budget, the primary claim was...

Suggested Citation

  • Michelle Brady & Kay Cook, 2015. "The impact of welfare to work on parents and their children," Evidence Base, Australia and New Zealand School of Government, vol. 2015(3), pages 1-23, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:exl:22evid:v:2015:y:2015:i:3:p:1-23
    DOI: 10.21307/eb-2015-003
    as

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    File URL: https://www.exeley.com/evidence_base/doi/10.21307/eb-2015-003
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Yi-Ping Tseng & Ha Vu & Roger Wilkins, 2008. "Dynamic Properties of Income Support Receipt in Australia," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 41(1), pages 32-55, March.
    2. Yin King Fok & Sung-Hee Jeon & Roger Wilkins, 2013. "Does part-time employment help or hinder single mothers' movements into full-time employment?," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 65(2), pages 523-547, April.
    3. Peter Dawkins, 2001. "The Case for Welfare Reform as Proposed by the McClure Report," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 34(1), pages 86-99.
    4. Lixin Cai & Ha Vu & Roger Wilkins, 2007. "Disability Support Pension Recipients: Who Gets Off (and Stays Off) Payments?," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 40(1), pages 37-61, March.
    5. Hielke Buddelmeyer & John Freebairn & Guyonne Kalb, 2006. "Evaluation of Policy Options to Encourage Welfare to Work," Australian Economic Review, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, vol. 39(3), pages 273-292, September.
    6. Ann Harding & Quoc Ngu Vu & Richard Percival & Gillian Beer, 2005. "Welfare-to-Work Reforms: Impact on Sole Parents," Agenda - A Journal of Policy Analysis and Reform, Australian National University, College of Business and Economics, School of Economics, vol. 12(3), pages 195-210.
    7. Simon Feeny & Rachel Ong & Heath Spong & Gavin Wood, 2012. "The Impact of Housing Assistance on the Employment Outcomes of Labour Market Programme Participants in Australia," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 49(4), pages 821-844, March.
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