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Class size and academic results, with a focus on children from culturally, linguistically and economically disenfranchised communities

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  • David Zyngier

    () (Curriculum and Pedagogy Monash University)

Abstract

The question of class size continues to attract the attention of educational policymakers and researchers alike. Australian politicians and their...

Suggested Citation

  • David Zyngier, 2014. "Class size and academic results, with a focus on children from culturally, linguistically and economically disenfranchised communities," Evidence Base, Australia and New Zealand School of Government, vol. 2014(1), pages 1-24, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:exl:22evid:v:2014:y:2014:i:1:p:1-24
    DOI: 10.21307/eb-2014-001
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Melvin Borland & Roy Howsen & Michelle Trawick, 2005. "An investigation of the effect of class size on student academic achievement," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(1), pages 73-83.
    2. Eric A. Hanushek, 2003. "The Failure of Input-Based Schooling Policies," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 113(485), pages 64-98, February.
    3. Caroline M. Hoxby, 2000. "The Effects of Class Size on Student Achievement: New Evidence from Population Variation," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 115(4), pages 1239-1285.
    4. J. N. Lye and J. G. Hirschberg, 2012. "What is a high school worth?: A model of Australian private secondary school fees," Department of Economics - Working Papers Series 1161, The University of Melbourne.
    5. Esfandiar Maasoumi & Daniel Millimet & Vasudha Rangaprasad, 2005. "Class Size and Educational Policy: Who Benefits from Smaller Classes?," Econometric Reviews, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(4), pages 333-368.
    6. Akerhielm, Karen, 1995. "Does class size matter?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 229-241, September.
    7. Joshua D. Angrist & Victor Lavy, 1999. "Using Maimonides' Rule to Estimate the Effect of Class Size on Scholastic Achievement," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 114(2), pages 533-575.
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