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Does educational attainment reduce agricultural day laborer injuries in Mexico?

Author

Listed:
  • Seth R. Gitter

    () (Department of Economics. Towson University, Towson, Maryland USA.)

  • Robert J. Gitter

    () (Department of Economics. Ohio Wesleyan University, Delaware, Ohio USA.)

Abstract

Agricultural work is an inherently dangerous job with the risk of injury considered part of a worker’s compensation. We focus on the determinants of an agricultural day laborer (jornalero) having experienced an injury while working. The policy variable of interest is the worker’s level of educational attainment as workers with a higher level may be better able to understand how equipment works and safety warnings. Controlling for other factors, we find that at the variable means, a jornalero with an additional year of education has a 7.7 percent lower probability of having experienced an accident.

Suggested Citation

  • Seth R. Gitter & Robert J. Gitter, 2014. "Does educational attainment reduce agricultural day laborer injuries in Mexico?," Ensayos Revista de Economia, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Facultad de Economia, vol. 0(2), pages 59-76, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:ere:journl:v:xxxiii:y:2014:i:2:p:59-76
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    File URL: http://www.economia.uanl.mx/revistaensayos/xxxiii/2/3._Does_Educational_Attainment_Reduce_Agricultural_Day_Laborer_Injuries_in_Mexico.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Strauss, John, 1986. "Does Better Nutrition Raise Farm Productivity?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(2), pages 297-320, April.
    2. T. Paul Schultz, 1999. "Health and Schooling Investments in Africa," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 13(3), pages 67-88, Summer.
    3. Pia Orrenius & Madeline Zavodny, 2009. "Do immigrants work in riskier jobs?," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 46(3), pages 535-551, August.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Agricultural employment; injuries; education; day laborers;

    JEL classification:

    • J43 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Agricultural Labor Markets
    • O13 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Agriculture; Natural Resources; Environment; Other Primary Products

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