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Valuation Contests over the Commoditisation of the Moabi Tree in South-Eastern Cameroon

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  • Sandra Veuthey
  • Julien-Francois Gerber

Abstract

We analyse the nature of grassroots conflicts over the commercial logging of moabi ( Baillonella toxisperma ) by foreign firms in South-eastern Cameroon. Moabi offers a good starting point for understanding forest resistances because it crystallises nature conservation, commercial, as well as local interests as it provides oil, medicine and other use values to local populations and particularly to women. Combining a political ecology approach with elements of ecological economics, we find that the conflicts on moabi extraction can be analysed in terms of conflicting languages of valuation - the defence of livelihood and customary institutions versus economic growth and the national laws. We discuss the historical and institutional components of the conflicts as well as the specific role of women.

Suggested Citation

  • Sandra Veuthey & Julien-Francois Gerber, 2011. "Valuation Contests over the Commoditisation of the Moabi Tree in South-Eastern Cameroon," Environmental Values, White Horse Press, vol. 20(2), pages 239-264, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:env:journl:ev20:ev2012
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Veuthey, Sandra & Gerber, Julien-François, 2010. "Logging conflicts in Southern Cameroon: A feminist ecological economics perspective," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(2), pages 170-177, December.
    2. Sneddon, Chris & Howarth, Richard B. & Norgaard, Richard B., 2006. "Sustainable development in a post-Brundtland world," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(2), pages 253-268, May.
    3. M'Gonigle, R. Michael, 1999. "Ecological economics and political ecology: towards a necessary synthesis," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 11-26, January.
    4. Gerber, Julien-François & Veuthey, Sandra & Martínez-Alier, Joan, 2009. "Linking political ecology with ecological economics in tree plantation conflicts in Cameroon and Ecuador," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(12), pages 2885-2889, October.
    5. Paavola, Jouni & Adger, W. Neil, 2005. "Institutional ecological economics," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(3), pages 353-368, May.
    6. Paavola, Jouni, 2007. "Institutions and environmental governance: A reconceptualization," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(1), pages 93-103, June.
    7. Muradian, Roldan & Martinez-Alier, Joan, 2001. "Trade and the environment: from a 'Southern' perspective," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(2), pages 281-297, February.
    8. Hornborg, Alf, 1998. "Towards an ecological theory of unequal exchange: articulating world system theory and ecological economics," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 25(1), pages 127-136, April.
    9. Daniel Bromley, 2004. "Reconsidering Environmental Policy: Prescriptive Consequentialism and Volitional Pragmatism," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 28(1), pages 73-99, May.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Clive L. Spash, 2011. "Terrible Economics, Ecosystems and Banking," Environmental Values, White Horse Press, vol. 20(2), pages 141-145, May.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Environmental conflicts; property rights; forest commercial exploitation; commodity chain; environmental valuation;

    JEL classification:

    • A13 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Relation of Economics to Social Values
    • Q01 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - General - - - Sustainable Development
    • Q23 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Forestry

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