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Terrible Economics, Ecosystems and Banking

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  • Clive L. Spash

Abstract

Why do conservation biologists, ecologists and other natural scientists working on environmental problems feel the need to copy, or rather parody, a narrow economic discourse? This editorial criicises this approach with reference to the UN's report The Economics of Biodiversity and the extension of tradable permits to such areas as endangered species and wetlands.

Suggested Citation

  • Clive L. Spash, 2011. "Terrible Economics, Ecosystems and Banking," Environmental Values, White Horse Press, vol. 20(2), pages 141-145, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:env:journl:ev20:editev202
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Stephen M. Gardiner, 2011. "Some Early Ethics of Geoengineering the Climate: A Commentary on the Values of the Royal Society Report," Environmental Values, White Horse Press, vol. 20(2), pages 163-188, May.
    2. Sandra Veuthey & Julien-Francois Gerber, 2011. "Valuation Contests over the Commoditisation of the Moabi Tree in South-Eastern Cameroon," Environmental Values, White Horse Press, vol. 20(2), pages 239-264, May.
    3. Spash, Clive L. & Vatn, Arild, 2006. "Transferring environmental value estimates: Issues and alternatives," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(2), pages 379-388, December.
    4. Spash, Clive L., 2007. "The economics of climate change impacts a la Stern: Novel and nuanced or rhetorically restricted?," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(4), pages 706-713, September.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Clive L. Spash, 2012. "Towards the integration of social, economic and ecological knowledge," SRE-Disc sre-disc-2012_04, Institute for Multilevel Governance and Development, Department of Socioeconomics, Vienna University of Economics and Business.
    2. Anguelovski, Isabelle & Martínez Alier, Joan, 2014. "The ‘Environmentalism of the Poor’ revisited: Territory and place in disconnected glocal struggles," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 167-176.
    3. Temper, Leah & Martinez-Alier, Joan, 2013. "The god of the mountain and Godavarman: Net Present Value, indigenous territorial rights and sacredness in a bauxite mining conflict in India," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(C), pages 79-87.
    4. Vatn, Arild, 2015. "Markets in environmental governance. From theory to practice," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 117(C), pages 225-233.
    5. Spash, Clive L., 2014. "The Politics of Researching Carbon Trading in Australia," SRE-Discussion Papers 4277, WU Vienna University of Economics and Business.
    6. Gruszka, Katarzyna & Scharbert, Annika Regine & Soder, Michael, 2017. "Leaving the mainstream behind? Uncovering subjective understandings of economics instructors' roles," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 131(C), pages 485-498.
    7. Clive L. Spash, 2012. "Green Economy, Red Herring," Environmental Values, White Horse Press, vol. 21(2), pages 95-99, May.
    8. Stör, Lorenz, 2017. "Conceptualizing power in the context of climate change: A multi-theoretical perspective on structure, agency & power relations," VÖÖ Discussion Papers 5/2017, Vereinigung für Ökologische Ökonomie e.V. (VÖÖ).
    9. Spash, Clive L., 2013. "The Ecological Economics of Boulding's Spaceship Earth," SRE-Discussion Papers 3919, WU Vienna University of Economics and Business.
    10. Spash, Clive L., 2013. "The shallow or the deep ecological economics movement?," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 351-362.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    TEEB; environmental discourse; tradable permits;

    JEL classification:

    • D61 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Allocative Efficiency; Cost-Benefit Analysis
    • Q26 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Recreational Aspects of Natural Resources

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