IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eme/jespps/v43y2016i1p141-164.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The role of lifelong learning on political stability and non violence: evidence from Africa

Author

Listed:
  • Simplice A. Asongu
  • Jacinta C. Nwachukwu

Abstract

Purpose - – Education as a weapon in the fight against conflict and violence remains widely debated in policy and academic circles. Against the background of growing political instability in Africa and the central role of the knowledge economy in twenty-first century development, this paper provides three contributions to existing literature. The purpose of this paper is to assess how political stability/non-violence is linked to the incremental, synergy and lifelong learning effects of education. Design/methodology/approach - – The authors define lifelong learning as the combined knowledge acquired during primary, secondary and tertiary education. Principal component analysis is used to reduce the dimensions of educational and political indicators. An endogeneity robust dynamic system Generalized Methods of Moments is used for the estimations. Findings - – The authors establish three main findings. First, education is a useful weapon in the fight against political instability. Second, there is an incremental effect of education in the transition from secondary to tertiary schools. Third, lifelong learning also has positive and synergy effects. This means that the impact of lifelong learning is higher than the combined independent effects of various educational levels. The empirical evidence is based on 53 African countries for the period 1996-2010. Practical implications - – A plethora of policy implications are discussed, inter alia: how the drive towards increasing the knowledge economy through lifelong learning can be an effective tool in the fight against violence and political insurgency in Africa. Originality/value - – As the continent is nursing knowledge economy ambitions, the paper is original in investigating the determinants of political stability/non-violence from three dimensions of education attainment: the incremental, the lifelong learning and a synergy effect.

Suggested Citation

  • Simplice A. Asongu & Jacinta C. Nwachukwu, 2016. "The role of lifelong learning on political stability and non violence: evidence from Africa," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 43(1), pages 141-164, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:eme:jespps:v:43:y:2016:i:1:p:141-164
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.emeraldinsight.com/10.1108/JES-06-2014-0087?utm_campaign=RePEc&WT.mc_id=RePEc
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version below or search for a different version of it.

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Macartan Humphreys, 2005. "Natural Resources, Conflict, and Conflict Resolution," Journal of Conflict Resolution, Peace Science Society (International), vol. 49(4), pages 508-537, August.
    2. Asongu, Simplice A., 2013. "On the effectiveness of foreign aid in institutional quality," European Economic Letters, European Economics Letters Group, vol. 2(1), pages 12-19.
    3. Daniel Lederman & Norman V. Loayza & Rodrigo R. Soares, 2005. "Accountability And Corruption: Political Institutions Matter," Economics and Politics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 17, pages 1-35, March.
    4. Simplice A. Asongu, 2014. "Knowledge Economy and Financial Sector Competition in African Countries," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 26(2), pages 333-346, June.
    5. Asongu Simplice, 2013. "Mobile banking and mobile phone penetration: which is more pro-poor in Africa?," Working Papers of the African Governance and Development Institute. 13/033, African Governance and Development Institute..
    6. Sumberg, James, 2005. "Systems of innovation theory and the changing architecture of agricultural research in Africa," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 21-41, February.
    7. Carlisle, Sheena & Kunc, Martin & Jones, Eleri & Tiffin, Scott, 2013. "Supporting innovation for tourism development through multi-stakeholder approaches: Experiences from Africa," Tourism Management, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 59-69.
    8. Simplice Asongu, 2014. "Globalization (fighting), corruption and development: How are these phenomena linearly and nonlinearly related in wealth effects?," Journal of Economic Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 41(3), pages 346-369, May.
    9. Asongu, Simplice A. & Kodila-Tedika, Oasis, 2013. "Crime and conflicts in Africa: consequences of corruption?," European Economic Letters, European Economics Letters Group, vol. 2(2), pages 50-55.
    10. Mina Baliamoune-Lutz, 2009. "Tunisia's Development Experience: A Success Story?," WIDER Working Paper Series RP2009-32, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    11. Augustin Kwasi Fosu, 2010. "Africa's Economic Future: Learning from the Past," CESifo Forum, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 11(01), pages 62-71, April.
    12. Simplice A. Asongu, 2013. "How has Mobile Phone Penetration Stimulated Financial Development in Africa?," Journal of African Business, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(1), pages 7-18, April.
    13. Arellano, Manuel & Bover, Olympia, 1995. "Another look at the instrumental variable estimation of error-components models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 68(1), pages 29-51, July.
    14. Mwangi wa Githinji & Olugbenga Adesida, 2011. "Industrialization, Exports and the Developmental State in Africa: The Case for Transformation," UMASS Amherst Economics Working Papers 2011-18, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Economics.
    15. Kim, Yee Kyoung & Lee, Keun & Park, Walter G. & Choo, Kineung, 2012. "Appropriate intellectual property protection and economic growth in countries at different levels of development," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 41(2), pages 358-375.
    16. Simplice A Asongu, 2013. "The ‘Knowledge Economy'-finance nexus: how do IPRs matter in SSA and MENA countries?," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 33(1), pages 78-94.
    17. Nguena Christian Lambert & Tsafack Nanfosso Roger, 2014. "On the Sensitivity of Banking Activity Shocks: Evidence from the CEMAC Sub-region," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 34(1), pages 354-372.
    18. Fosu, Augustin Kwasi, 2012. "Development Success: Historical Accounts from More Advanced Countries," WIDER Working Paper Series 071, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    19. Truex, Rory, 2011. "Corruption, Attitudes, and Education: Survey Evidence from Nepal," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(7), pages 1133-1142, July.
    20. Simplice A Asongu, 2013. "Modeling the future of knowledge economy: evidence from SSA and MENA countries," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 33(1), pages 612-624.
    21. Antonio Andrés & Simplice Asongu, 2013. "Fighting Software Piracy: Which Governance Tools Matter in Africa?," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 118(3), pages 667-682, December.
    22. Nicholas Eubank, 2012. "Taxation, Political Accountability and Foreign Aid: Lessons from Somaliland," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(4), pages 465-480, March.
    23. Simplice A Asongu & Jellal Mohamed, 2013. "On the channels of foreign aid to corruption," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 33(3), pages 2191-2201.
    24. Antonio R Andres & Simplice A Asongu, 2013. "Global dynamic timelines for IPRs harmonization against software piracy," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 33(1), pages 874-880.
    25. Simplice Asongu, 2013. "Harmonizing IPRs on Software Piracy: Empirics of Trajectories in Africa," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 118(1), pages 45-60, November.
    26. Magnus Saxegaard, 2006. "Excess Liquidity and Effectiveness of Monetary Policy; Evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa," IMF Working Papers 06/115, International Monetary Fund.
    27. Vanessa Simen Tchamyou, 2017. "The Role of Knowledge Economy in African Business," Journal of the Knowledge Economy, Springer;Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology (PICMET), vol. 8(4), pages 1189-1228, December.
    28. Thierry PENARD & Nicolas POUSSING & Gabriel ZOMO YEBE & Philémon NSI ELLA, 2012. "Comparing the Determinants of Internet and Cell Phone Use in Africa: Evidence from Gabon," Communications & Strategies, IDATE, Com&Strat dept., vol. 1(86), pages 65-83, 2nd quart.
    29. Jenny C. Aker & Isaac M. Mbiti, 2010. "Mobile Phones and Economic Development in Africa," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 24(3), pages 207-232, Summer.
    30. Voxi Heinrich Amavilah, 2009. "Knowledge of African countries: production and value of doctoral dissertations," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 41(8), pages 977-989.
    31. Naci Mocan, 2008. "What Determines Corruption? International Evidence From Microdata," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 46(4), pages 493-510, October.
    32. Yaw Nyarko, 2013. "Sustaining High Economic Growth in Sub-Saharan Africa: Knowledge and the Structure of the Economy," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 22(suppl_1), pages -101, January.
    33. repec:unu:wpaper:wp2012-71 is not listed on IDEAS
    34. Fosu, Augustin K. (ed.), 2012. "Development Success: Historical Accounts from More Advanced Countries," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199660704.
    35. Simplice Asongu & Oasis Kodila-Tedika, 2016. "Fighting African conflicts and crimes: which governance tools matter?," International Journal of Social Economics, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 43(5), pages 466-485, May.
    36. Lee, Keun & Kim, Byung-Yeon, 2009. "Both Institutions and Policies Matter but Differently for Different Income Groups of Countries: Determinants of Long-Run Economic Growth Revisited," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 37(3), pages 533-549, March.
    37. Letiche, John M., 2006. "Positive economic incentives: New behavioral economics and successful economic transitions," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(5), pages 775-796, November.
    38. Yaw Nyarko & Kwabena Gyimah-Brempon, 2011. "Social Safety Nets: The Role of Education, Remittances and Migration," RSCAS Working Papers 2011/26, European University Institute.
    39. Philip Oreopoulos & Kjell G. Salvanes, 2009. "How large are returns to schooling? Hint: Money isn't everything," NBER Working Papers 15339, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    40. Lin, Brian Chi-ang, 2006. "A sustainable perspective on the knowledge economy: A critique of Austrian and mainstream views," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(1), pages 324-332, November.
    41. Keun Lee, 2009. "How Can Korea be a Role Model for Catch-up Development?: A 'Capability-based View'," WIDER Working Paper Series RP2009-34, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    42. German, Laura & Stroud, Ann, 2007. "A Framework for the Integration of Diverse Learning Approaches: Operationalizing Agricultural Research and Development (R&D) Linkages in Eastern Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 35(5), pages 792-814, May.
    43. Simplice A Asongu, 2012. "On the effect of foreign aid on corruption," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 32(3), pages 2174-2180.
    44. Fosu, Augustin Kwasi, 2013. "Achieving Development Success: Strategies and Lessons from the Developing World," WIDER Working Paper Series 027, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    45. Manuel Arellano & Stephen Bond, 1991. "Some Tests of Specification for Panel Data: Monte Carlo Evidence and an Application to Employment Equations," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 58(2), pages 277-297.
    46. Simplice Asongu, 2015. "Fighting Software Piracy in Africa: How Do Legal Origins and IPRs Protection Channels Matter?," Journal of the Knowledge Economy, Springer;Portland International Center for Management of Engineering and Technology (PICMET), vol. 6(4), pages 682-703, December.
    47. Blundell, Richard & Bond, Stephen, 1998. "Initial conditions and moment restrictions in dynamic panel data models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 87(1), pages 115-143, August.
    48. Lalountas, Dionisios A. & Manolas, George A. & Vavouras, Ioannis S., 2011. "Corruption, globalization and development: How are these three phenomena related?," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 33(4), pages 636-648, July.
    49. Asongu Simplice, 2011. "Government Quality Determinants of Stock Market Performance in African Countries," Working Papers of the African Governance and Development Institute. 11/019, African Governance and Development Institute..
    50. repec:unu:wpaper:unupb3-2013 is not listed on IDEAS
    51. Zerbe, Noah, 2005. "Biodiversity, ownership, and indigenous knowledge: Exploring legal frameworks for community, farmers, and intellectual property rights in Africa," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 53(4), pages 493-506, June.
    52. Christian-Lambert Nguena & Roger Tsafack-Nanfosso, 2014. "On the Sensitivity of Banking Activity to Macroeconomic Shocks: Evidence from CEMAC Sub-region [Sensibilité du Secteur Bancaire aux Chocs Macroéconomiques: Cas de la sous-région CEMAC]," Post-Print halshs-01097850, HAL.
    53. Fosu, Augustin K. (ed.), 2013. "Achieving Development Success: Strategies and Lessons from the Developing World," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199671557.
    54. Henry Kaiser, 1974. "An index of factorial simplicity," Psychometrika, Springer;The Psychometric Society, vol. 39(1), pages 31-36, March.
    55. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1988. "On the mechanics of economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 3-42, July.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Africa; Stability; Development; Lilfelong learning;

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy
    • K42 - Law and Economics - - Legal Procedure, the Legal System, and Illegal Behavior - - - Illegal Behavior and the Enforcement of Law
    • O10 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - General
    • O55 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Africa

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eme:jespps:v:43:y:2016:i:1:p:141-164. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Virginia Chapman). General contact details of provider: http://www.emeraldinsight.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.