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Islamic banking and economic growth: the Indonesian experience

Author

Listed:
  • Muhamad Abduh
  • Mohd Azmi Omar

Abstract

Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to examine the short-run and the long-run relationships between Islamic banking development and economic growth in the case of Indonesia. Design/methodology/approach - Using quarterly data (2003:1-2010:2), this paper utilizes the bound testing approach of cointegration and error correction models, developed within an autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL) framework. Findings - The results demonstrate a significant relationship in short-run and long-run periods between Islamic financial development and economic growth. The relationship, however, is neither Schumpeter's supply-leading nor Robinson's demand-following. It appears to be bi-directional relationship. Originality/value - This paper uses empirical evidence to show the role of Islamic banks' financing towards economic performance of a country. To the best of the authors' knowledge, the study on the role of Islamic banking development towards economic growth is limited, particularly in the context of Indonesia.

Suggested Citation

  • Muhamad Abduh & Mohd Azmi Omar, 2012. "Islamic banking and economic growth: the Indonesian experience," International Journal of Islamic and Middle Eastern Finance and Management, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 5(1), pages 35-47, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eme:imefpp:v:5:y:2012:i:1:p:35-47
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Pesaran, M.H. & Shin, Y., 1995. "An Autoregressive Distributed Lag Modelling Approach to Cointegration Analysis," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 9514, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    2. Pesaran, M. H. & Shin, Y. & Smith, R. J., 1996. "Testing for the 'Existence of a Long-run Relationship'," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 9622, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    3. Kassim, Salina, 2016. "Islamic finance and economic growth: The Malaysian experience," Global Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 66-76.
    4. Robert G. King & Ross Levine, 1993. "Finance and Growth: Schumpeter Might Be Right," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 108(3), pages 717-737.
    5. Felix Rioja & Neven Valev, 2004. "Finance and the Sources of Growth at Various Stages of Economic Development," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 42(1), pages 127-140, January.
    6. Ross Levine & Norman Loayza & Thorsten Beck, 2002. "Financial Intermediation and Growth: Causality and Causes," Central Banking, Analysis, and Economic Policies Book Series,in: Leonardo Hernández & Klaus Schmidt-Hebbel & Norman Loayza (Series Editor) & Klaus Schmidt-Hebbel (Se (ed.), Banking, Financial Integration, and International Crises, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 2, pages 031-084 Central Bank of Chile.
    7. Raymond Fisman & Inessa Love, 2007. "Financial Dependence and Growth Revisited," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 5(2-3), pages 470-479, 04-05.
    8. Demetriades, Panicos O. & Hussein, Khaled A., 1996. "Does financial development cause economic growth? Time-series evidence from 16 countries," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(2), pages 387-411, December.
    9. M. Hashem Pesaran & Yongcheol Shin & Richard J. Smith, 2001. "Bounds testing approaches to the analysis of level relationships," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(3), pages 289-326.
    10. Deidda, Luca & Fattouh, Bassam, 2002. "Non-linearity between finance and growth," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 74(3), pages 339-345, February.
    11. Beck, Thorsten & Levine, Ross & Loayza, Norman, 2000. "Finance and the sources of growth," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(1-2), pages 261-300.
    12. De Gregorio, Jose & Guidotti, Pablo E., 1995. "Financial development and economic growth," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 433-448, March.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Guglielmo Maria Caporale & Mohamad Husam Helmi, 2016. "Islamic Banking, Credit and Economic Growth: Some Empirical Evidence," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1541, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    2. Kassim, Salina, 2016. "Islamic finance and economic growth: The Malaysian experience," Global Finance Journal, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 66-76.
    3. Bm, Hakim & Uddin, Md Akther, 2016. "Does Islamic bank financing lead to economic growth: An empirical analysis for Malaysia," MPRA Paper 69075, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Elmawazini, Khaled & Khiyar, Khiyar Abdalla & Al Galfy, Ahmad & Aydilek, Asiye, 2015. "Types of banking institutions and economic growth: An endogenous growth model," Economics Discussion Papers 2015-61, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    5. Mosab I. Tabash & Raj S. Dhankar, 2014. "Islamic Banking and Economic Growth — A cointegration Approach," Romanian Economic Journal, Department of International Business and Economics from the Academy of Economic Studies Bucharest, vol. 17(53), pages 61-90, September.

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