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Market structure of China's network industry


  • Lifang Zhang
  • Minghong Zhang


Purpose - This paper aims to study network effects and the impacts on market structure in the specific context of China's network industries. Design/methodology/approach - This paper is organized in the mode of “concept-model analysis-empirical examination”. Starting from the concept of “network effect”, it is then extended to the theoretical analysis of market structure and the examination of China's representative network industries. Findings - The data for China's representative network industries produce mixed findings. Some prove the theoretical estimation quite well, while others do not follow the theoretical conclusion so closely. Research limitations/implications - The data for China's network industry are relatively limited. The depth of the data is especially inadequate, which prevents more systematic econometrical analysis. Practical implications - The paper can serve as a reference for private decision makers of network industries and for regulators with antitrust concerns. Originality/value - This paper may be the first of its kind to study the market structure of China's network industries from the perspective of network effects theory. It could be a good reference for those interested in learning the current status of China's network industries.

Suggested Citation

  • Lifang Zhang & Minghong Zhang, 2008. "Market structure of China's network industry," Journal of Chinese Economic and Foreign Trade Studies, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 1(1), pages 75-87, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:eme:ceftpp:v:1:y:2008:i:1:p:75-87

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    References listed on IDEAS

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