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Work in Progress? The Industrious Revolution

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  • Clark, Gregory
  • Werf, Ysbrand Van Der

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  • Clark, Gregory & Werf, Ysbrand Van Der, 1998. "Work in Progress? The Industrious Revolution," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 58(03), pages 830-843, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:jechis:v:58:y:1998:i:03:p:830-843_02
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    Cited by:

    1. Koyama, Mark, 2012. "The transformation of labor supply in the pre-industrial world," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 81(2), pages 505-523.
    2. Thomas Barnebeck Andersen & Jeanet Bentzen & Carl-Johan Dalgaard & Paul Sharp, 2010. "Religious Orders and Growth through Cultural Change in Pre-Industrial England," DEGIT Conference Papers c015_036, DEGIT, Dynamics, Economic Growth, and International Trade.
    3. repec:kap:jecgro:v:22:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s10887-017-9145-z is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Morgan Kelly & Cormac Ó Gráda, 2012. "Agricultural output, calories and living standards in England before and during the Industrial Revolution," Working Papers 201212, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
    5. Bas van Leeuwen & Jieli van Leeuwen-Li & Reinhard Pirngruber, 2013. "The standard of living in ancient societies: a comparison between the Han Empire, the Roman Empire, and Babylonia," Working Papers 0045, Utrecht University, Centre for Global Economic History.
    6. repec:wly:econjl:v:127:y:2017:i:604:p:1756-1793 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Mark Koyama, 2009. "The Price of Time and Labour Supply: From the Black Death to the Industrious Revolution," Economics Series Working Papers Number 78, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    8. Angeles, Luis, 2008. "GDP per capita or real wages? Making sense of conflicting views on pre-industrial Europe," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 45(2), pages 147-163, April.
    9. Holger Strulik, 2016. "Secularization And Long-Run Economic Growth," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 54(1), pages 177-200, January.
    10. Broadberry, Stephen, 2013. "Accounting for the great divergence," Economic History Working Papers 54573, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
    11. Tiago Cavalcanti & Stephen Parente & Rui Zhao, 2007. "Religion in macroeconomics: a quantitative analysis of Weber’s thesis," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 32(1), pages 105-123, July.
    12. Dalgaard, Carl-Johan & Olsson, Ola, 2007. "Why Are Market Economies Politically Stable? A Theory of Capitalist Cohesion," Working Papers in Economics 280, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
    13. Jonathan Hersh & Joachim Voth, 2009. "Sweet diversity: Colonial goods and the rise of European living standards after 1492," Economics Working Papers 1163, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra, revised Jan 2011.
    14. Clark, Gregory, 2010. "The Consumer Revolution: Turning Point in Human History, or Statistical Artifact?," MPRA Paper 25467, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    15. Paul R. Sharp & Jacob L. Weisdorf, 2012. "French revolution or industrial revolution? A note on the contrasting experiences of England and France up to 1800," Cliometrica, Journal of Historical Economics and Econometric History, Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC), vol. 6(1), pages 79-88, January.
    16. David Flacher, 2005. "Industrial Revolutions and Consumption: A Common Model to the Various Periods of Industrialization," Working Papers halshs-00132241, HAL.
    17. Riello, Giorgio & O'Brien, Patrick, 2004. "Reconstructing the Industrial Revolution: analyses, perceptions and conceptions of Britain’s precocious transition to Europe’s first industrial society," Economic History Working Papers 22337, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
    18. David Flacher, 2005. "Industrial Revolutions and Consumption: A Common Model to the Various Periods of Industrialization," CEPN Working Papers halshs-00132241, HAL.
    19. Brock,W.A. & Durlauf,S.N., 2005. "Social interactions and macroeconomics," Working papers 5, Wisconsin Madison - Social Systems.
    20. Thomas Barnebeck Andersen & Jeanet Bentzen & Carl‐Johan Dalgaard & Paul Sharp, 2017. "Pre‐reformation Roots of the Protestant Ethic," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 127(604), pages 1756-1793, September.
    21. Carl-Johan Dalgaard & Ola Olsson, 2013. "Why Are Rich Countries More Politically Cohesive?," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 115(2), pages 423-448, April.
    22. Ho, Chi Pui, 2016. "Industrious Selection: Explaining Five Revolutions and Two Divergences in Eurasian Economic History within a Unified Growth Framework," MPRA Paper 73862, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    23. Marina E. Adshade, 2009. "The Rich Are Different From The Rest Of Us," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 55(4), pages 959-967, December.

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