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How it all began: the monetary and financial architecture of Europe during the first global capital markets, 1648 1815

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  • NEAL, LARRY

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  • Neal, Larry, 2000. "How it all began: the monetary and financial architecture of Europe during the first global capital markets, 1648 1815," Financial History Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 7(02), pages 117-140, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:cup:fihrev:v:7:y:2000:i:02:p:117-140_00
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    Cited by:

    1. Daniel Barbezat, 2011. "The Economic History of European Growth," Chapters,in: International Handbook on Teaching and Learning Economics, chapter 51 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Larry Neal & Marc D. Weidenmier, 2001. "Crises in The Global Economy from Tulips to Today: Contagion and Consequences," Claremont Colleges Working Papers 2001-32, Claremont Colleges.
    3. Stephen Quinn, 2008. "Securitization of Sovereign Debt: Corporations as a Sovereign Debt Restructuring Mechanism in Britain, 1694-1750," Working Papers 200701, Texas Christian University, Department of Economics.
    4. Maurice Obstfeld & Alan M. Taylor, 2003. "Globalization and Capital Markets," NBER Chapters,in: Globalization in Historical Perspective, pages 121-188 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Quinn, Stephen & Roberds, William, 2014. "How Amsterdam got fiat money," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 1-12.
    6. Flandreau, Marc & Sussman, Nathan, 2004. "Old Sins: Exchange Rate Clauses and European Foreign Lending in the 19th Century," CEPR Discussion Papers 4248, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    7. Marc Flandreau & Nathan Sussman, 2004. "Old sins. Exchange Clauses and European Foreign Lending in the 19th Century," Sciences Po publications n°4248, Sciences Po.
    8. Daron Acemoglu & Simon Johnson & James Robinson, 2005. "The Rise of Europe: Atlantic Trade, Institutional Change, and Economic Growth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(3), pages 546-579, June.
    9. Brown, William Jr. & Burdekin, Richard C.K. & Weidenmier, Marc D., 2006. "Volatility in an era of reduced uncertainty: Lessons from Pax Britannica," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 79(3), pages 693-707, March.
    10. Patrick K. O’Brien & Nuno Palma, 2016. "Danger to the Old Lady of Threadneedle Street? The Bank Restriction Act and the Regime Shift to Paper Money, 1797-1821," Working Papers 67, Queen Mary, University of London, School of Business and Management, Centre for Globalisation Research, revised Oct 2016.
    11. Michele FRATIANNI, 2007. "The Evolutionary Chain of International Financial Centers," Working Papers 303, Universita' Politecnica delle Marche (I), Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche e Sociali.
    12. Nogues-Marco, Pilar, 2017. "Money Markets and Exchange Rates in Pre-Industrial Europe," Working Papers unige:100808, University of Geneva, Paul Bairoch Institute of Economic History.
    13. Altorfer, Stefan, 2004. "The canton of Berne as an investor on the London capital market in the 18th century," Economic History Working Papers 22336, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
    14. Malinowski, Mikołaj, 2012. "The costs and benefits of microfinance. The market for Dutch East India Company transportbriefen in 18th century Amsterdam," MPRA Paper 64632, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    15. Toms, J.S., 2010. "Calculating profit: A historical perspective on the development of capitalism," Accounting, Organizations and Society, Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 205-221, February.
    16. Rafael Torres Sánchez & Javier Gómez Biscarri & Fernando Pérez de Gracia, 2004. "Exchange Rate Behavior and Exchange Rate Puzzles: Why the XVIII Century Might Help," Faculty Working Papers 12/04, School of Economics and Business Administration, University of Navarra.
    17. Stephen F. Quinn & William Roberds, 2006. "An economic explanation of the early Bank of Amsterdam, debasement, bills of exchange, and the emergence of the first central bank," FRB Atlanta Working Paper 2006-13, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.
    18. William Roberds & Stephen Quinn, 2007. "The Bank of Amsterdam and the Leap to Central Bank Money," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(2), pages 262-265, May.

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