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Digital Challenges for the Welfare State

Author

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  • Werner Eichhorst
  • Ulf Rinne

Abstract

Digitalization is the buzzword under which profound changes of the labor market can be summarized. Next to automation, i.e., the increasing use of robots, "intelligent" machines and more comprehensive algorithms that is no longer restricted to routine tasks, especially the emerging platform economy may pose significant "digital challenges" for the welfare state. This article sheds light on the potentially eroding foundations of the welfare state, it discusses tools for combating a potential digital divide on the individual level, and it proposes a new institutional perspective on firms, workers, and the welfare state.
(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Suggested Citation

  • Werner Eichhorst & Ulf Rinne, 2017. "Digital Challenges for the Welfare State," CESifo Forum, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 18(4), pages 03-08, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ifofor:v:18:y:2017:i:4:p:03-08
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    File URL: http://www.cesifo-group.de/DocDL/CESifo-forum-2017-4-eichhorst-rinne-digitalisation-welfare-state-december.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Maselli, Ilaria & Lenaerts, Karolien & Beblavý, Miroslav, 2016. "Five things we need to know about the on-demand economy," CEPS Papers 11209, Centre for European Policy Studies.
    2. Maarten Goos & Alan Manning & Anna Salomons, 2014. "Explaining Job Polarization: Routine-Biased Technological Change and Offshoring," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 104(8), pages 2509-2526, August.
    3. Rendall, Michelle & Weiss, Franziska J., 2016. "Employment polarization and the role of the apprenticeship system," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 82(C), pages 166-186.
    4. Berg, Janine., 2016. "Income security in the on-demand economy : findings and policy lessons from a survey of crowdworkers," ILO Working Papers 994906483402676, International Labour Organization.
    5. repec:nbr:nberch:14019 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Leimeister, Jan Marco & Durward, David & Zogaj, Shkodran, 2016. "Crowd Worker in Deutschland: Eine empirische Studie zum Arbeitsumfeld auf externen Crowdsourcing-Plattformen," Study / edition der Hans-Böckler-Stiftung, Hans-Böckler-Stiftung, Düsseldorf, volume 127, number 323.
    7. Werner Eichhorst, 2015. "Does vocational training help young people find a (good) job?," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 112-112, January.
    8. repec:spr:wirtsc:v:97:y:2017:i:5:d:10.1007_s10273-017-2146-x is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Lawrence F. Katz & Alan B. Krueger, 2016. "The Rise and Nature of Alternative Work Arrangements in the United States, 1995-2015," Working Papers 603, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
    10. Eichhorst, Werner & Hinte, Holger & Rinne, Ulf & Tobsch, Verena, 2017. "How Big is the Gig? Assessing the Preliminary Evidence on the Effects of Digitalization on the Labor Market," management revue - Socio-Economic Studies, Nomos Verlagsgesellschaft mbH & Co. KG, vol. 28(3), pages 298-318.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Valerio De Stefano & Antonio Aloisi, 2018. "European legal framework for "digital labour platforms"," JRC Working Papers JRC112243, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Computerunterstützung; Sozialstaat; Arbeitsmarkt; Sozialversicherung; Digitalisierung;

    JEL classification:

    • I30 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General
    • J00 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - General
    • O00 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - General - - - General

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