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Buyer Shopping Costs and Retail Pricing: An Indirect Empirical Test

Author

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  • Lee Sang-Yong T.

    () (National University of Singapore)

  • Png Ivan P.L.

    () (National University of Singapore)

Abstract

Suppose that consumers incur fixed shopping costs and choose stores according to advertised discounts. Then, the extent to which a store will discount advertised items should increase with the profit from other regularly-priced items. Bookstores customarily advertise discounts on bestsellers. Among conventional bookstores, we found that the bestseller discount systematically increased with the store area, selection of titles, and presence of other product categories. One standard deviation increase in store area was associated with a 3.7 (± 1.8) higher bestseller percentage discount. Among online stores, we found that the bestseller discount systematically increased with the selection of titles and number of product categories. One standard deviation increase in selection was associated with a 9.5 (± 2.2) higher bestseller percentage discount. These results indirectly confirm that booksellers discount bestsellers to attract consumers, and that consumers bear significant fixed shopping costs.

Suggested Citation

  • Lee Sang-Yong T. & Png Ivan P.L., 2004. "Buyer Shopping Costs and Retail Pricing: An Indirect Empirical Test," Review of Marketing Science, De Gruyter, vol. 2(1), pages 1-22, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:bpj:revmkt:v:2:y:2004:i:1:p:1-22:n:7
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Karen Clay & Ramayya Krishnan & Eric Wolff, 2001. "Prices and Price Dispersion on the Web: Evidence from the Online Book Industry," NBER Chapters, in: E-commerce, pages 521-539, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Brennan Platt & Nuray Akin, 2012. "A theory of search with recall and uncertain deadlines," 2012 Meeting Papers 777, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    2. Pradeep K. Chintagunta & Junhong Chu & Javier Cebollada, 2012. "Quantifying Transaction Costs in Online/Off-line Grocery Channel Choice," Marketing Science, INFORMS, vol. 31(1), pages 96-114, January.
    3. Ş. Akın & Brennan Platt, 2014. "A theory of search with deadlines and uncertain recall," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 55(1), pages 101-133, January.
    4. T. Randolph Beard & Michael L. Stern, 2008. "Continuous Cross Subsidies And Quantity Restrictions," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 56(4), pages 840-861, December.

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