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Domestic Violence, Poverty, and Social Services: Does Location Matter?


  • Andrea Hetling
  • Haiyan Zhang


This study investigates whether or not domestic violence agencies are located in areas of need. Recent research indicates that community economic disadvantage is a risk factor for intimate partner violence, but related questions regarding the geographic location of social service agencies have not been investigated. Copyright (c) 2010 by the Southwestern Social Science Association.

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  • Andrea Hetling & Haiyan Zhang, 2010. "Domestic Violence, Poverty, and Social Services: Does Location Matter?," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 91(s1), pages 1144-1163.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:socsci:v:91:y:2010:i:s1:p:1144-1163

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Rebecca M. Blank, 2005. "Poverty, Policy, and Place: How Poverty and Policies to Alleviate Poverty Are Shaped by Local Characteristics," International Regional Science Review, , vol. 28(4), pages 441-464, October.
    2. repec:aph:ajpbhl:10.2105/ajph.2007.112813_0 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Rachel Pain, 2001. "Gender, Race, Age and Fear in the City," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 38(5-6), pages 899-913, May.
    4. Scott W. Allard & Richard M. Tolman & Daniel Rosen, 2003. "Proximity to service providers and service utilization among welfare recipients: The interaction of place and race," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(4), pages 599-613.
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    Cited by:

    1. Thomas Schofield & Melissa Merrick & Chia-Feng Chen, 2016. "Reciprocal Associations between Neighborhood Context and Parent Investments: Selection Effects in Two Longitudinal Samples," Working Papers wp16-08-ff, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Center for Research on Child Wellbeing..

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