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Density Zoning and Class Segregation in U.S. Metropolitan Areas


  • Jonathan T. Rothwell
  • Douglas S. Massey


Socioeconomic segregation rose substantially in U.S. cities during the final decades of the 20th century, and we argue that zoning regulations are an important cause of this increase. Copyright (c) 2010 by the Southwestern Social Science Association.

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  • Jonathan T. Rothwell & Douglas S. Massey, 2010. "Density Zoning and Class Segregation in U.S. Metropolitan Areas," Social Science Quarterly, Southwestern Social Science Association, vol. 91(s1), pages 1123-1143.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:socsci:v:91:y:2010:i:s1:p:1123-1143

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Charles M. Tiebout, 1956. "A Pure Theory of Local Expenditures," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 64, pages 416-416.
    2. repec:hrv:faseco:4553034 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Alberto Alesina & Reza Baqir & Caroline Hoxby, 2004. "Political Jurisdictions in Heterogeneous Communities," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 112(2), pages 348-396, April.
    4. James L. Mitchell, 2004. "Will empowering developers to challenge exclusionary zoning increase suburban housing choice?," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 23(1), pages 119-134.
    5. Helen F. Ladd, 1992. "Population Growth, Density and the Costs of Providing Public Services," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 29(2), pages 273-295, April.
    6. Edward L. Glaeser & Kristina Tobio, 2007. "The Rise of the Sunbelt," NBER Working Papers 13071, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Claude Fischer & Gretchen Stockmayer & Jon Stiles & Michael Hout, 2004. "Distinguishing the geographic levels and social dimensions of U.S. metropolitan segregation, 1960–2000," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 41(1), pages 37-59, February.
    8. Glaeser, Edward L. & Kahn, Matthew E. & Rappaport, Jordan, 2008. "Why do the poor live in cities The role of public transportation," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(1), pages 1-24, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Werner Troesken & Randall Walsh, 2017. "Collective Action, White Flight, and the Origins of Formal Segregation Laws," NBER Working Papers 23691, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Jonathan T. Rothwell & Douglas S. Massey, 2015. "Geographic Effects on Intergenerational Income Mobility," Economic Geography, Clark University, vol. 91(1), pages 83-106, January.
    3. Olugbenga Ajilore, 2016. "The Spillover Effect of Race on Police Expenditures: An Alternative Test of the Minority Threat Hypothesis," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer;National Economic Association, vol. 43(1), pages 21-34, March.

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