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The Impact of Economic Sanctions on South African Exports

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  • Evenett, Simon J

Abstract

In the mid-1980s many nations imposed sanctions on South African exports, most of which were subsequently removed during 1991-93. I estimate the effect of eight industrialized economies' sanctions on their imports from South Africa. Outliers are found to strongly influence the parameter estimates. Failure to take account of them leads to the conclusion that sanctions by the (then) European Communities most adversely affected South African exports. In fact, robustness checks reveal that the United States' Comprehensive Anti-Apartheid Act played the largest role, reducing bilateral imports by a third. The broader implications of these findings for estimating gravity equations are discussed. Copyright 2002 by Scottish Economic Society.

Suggested Citation

  • Evenett, Simon J, 2002. "The Impact of Economic Sanctions on South African Exports," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 49(5), pages 557-573, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:scotjp:v:49:y:2002:i:5:p:557-73
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    Cited by:

    1. Shingal, ANIRUDH, 2009. "How much do agreements matter for services trade?," MPRA Paper 32815, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 15 May 2010.
    2. Neuenkirch, Matthias & Neumeier, Florian, 2016. "The impact of US sanctions on poverty," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 121(C), pages 110-119.
    3. Neuenkirch, Matthias & Neumeier, Florian, 2015. "The impact of UN and US economic sanctions on GDP growth," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 40(PA), pages 110-125.
    4. Liudmila Popova & Ehsan Rasoulinezhad, 2016. "Have Sanctions Modified Iran’s Trade Policy? An Evidence of Asianization and De-Europeanization through the Gravity Model," Economies, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 4(4), pages 1-15, October.
    5. Koji Kubo, 2014. "Myanmar's non-resource export potential after the lifting of economic sanctions: a gravity model analysis," Asia-Pacific Development Journal, United Nations Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP), vol. 21(1), pages 1-22, June.

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