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Financial Constraints and Investment Decisions


  • Saltari, Enrico
  • Travaglini, Giuseppe


In what follows we show that liquidity constraints can affect a firm's investment even when the constraints are not currently effective. This happens when, at any given time, the firm believes that internal finance is likely to become a constraint in the future. In these circumstances, the value of the firm becomes a non-monotonic functional form of the fundamental. Thus, in a dynamic setting, the potential barrier to internal liquidity expansion exerts a global effect on the firm's investment policy, lowering its desired investment profile. Copyright 2001 by Scottish Economic Society.

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  • Saltari, Enrico & Travaglini, Giuseppe, 2001. "Financial Constraints and Investment Decisions," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 48(3), pages 330-344, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:scotjp:v:48:y:2001:i:3:p:330-44

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Heckman, James, 2013. "Sample selection bias as a specification error," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 31(3), pages 129-137.
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    Cited by:

    1. Saltari, Enrico & Giuseppe, Travaglini, 2011. "Optimal capital stock and financing constraints," MPRA Paper 35094, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Saltari, Enrico & Travaglini, Giuseppe, 2006. "The effects of future financing constraints on capital accumulation: Some new results on the constrained investment problem," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 60(2), pages 85-96, June.
    3. Francesco Crespi & Giuseppe Scellato, 2010. "Ownership Structure, Internal Financing And Investment Dynamics," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 78(3), pages 242-258, June.
    4. Ferrando, Annalisa & Preuss, Carsten, 2018. "What finance for what investment? Survey-based evidence for European companies," EIB Working Papers 2018/01, European Investment Bank (EIB).
    5. Domenico Sarno, 2007. "Financial structure and Southern Italy firms’ growth," QA - Rivista dell'Associazione Rossi-Doria, Associazione Rossi Doria, issue 2, May.
    6. Saltari, E. & Travaglini, G., 2012. "A note on optimal capital stock and financing constraints," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 29(4), pages 1177-1180.

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