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Ethnic Differences in the Incidence and Determinants of Employer-Funded Training in Britain

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  • Shields, Michael A
  • Price, Stephen Wheatley

Abstract

Non-white full-time employees were offered, and undertook, less training than whites in Britain in 1993-94, according to data from the Quarterly Labour Force Survey. Estimates of the determinants of training outcomes and training offers show a marked consistency across white and non-white, male and female, employees. Over 90% of the average predicted training outcome differential, and 50%-60% of the difference in mean predicted training offers, cannot be explained by differences in observable characteristics between white and non-white employees. These findings suggest that equal opportunities legislation has been unsuccessful in eliminating unequal access to employer-funded training in Britain. Copyright 1999 by Scottish Economic Society.

Suggested Citation

  • Shields, Michael A & Price, Stephen Wheatley, 1999. "Ethnic Differences in the Incidence and Determinants of Employer-Funded Training in Britain," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 46(5), pages 523-551, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:scotjp:v:46:y:1999:i:5:p:523-51
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    Cited by:

    1. Hatton, Timothy J. & Wheatley Price, Stephen, 1998. "Migration, Migrants and Policy in the United Kingdom," CEPR Discussion Papers 1960, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    2. Pudney, Stephen & Shields, Michael A, 2000. " Gender and Racial Discrimination in Pay and Promotion for NHS Nurses," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 62(0), pages 801-835, Special I.
    3. Shields, Michael A & Price, Stephen Wheatley, 2002. "Racial Harassment, Job Satisfaction and Intentions to Quit: Evidence from the British Nursing Profession," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 69(274), pages 295-226, May.
    4. Alan Barrett & Séamus McGuinness & Martin O’Brien & Philip O’Connell, 2013. "Immigrants and Employer-provided Training," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 34(1), pages 52-78, March.
    5. John Gibson & Carolyn Watane, 2001. "Why is job security lower for Maori and pacific island workers? The role of employer-provided training," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(1), pages 1-24.
    6. Filipe Almeida-Santos & Karen Mumford, 2005. "Employee Training And Wage Compression In Britain," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 73(3), pages 321-342, June.
    7. Melanie Jones & Paul Latreille & Peter Sloane, 2004. "Crossing the Tracks? More on Trends in the Training of Male and Female Workers in Great Britain," LoWER Working Papers wp9, AIAS, Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labour Studies.
    8. John Gibson, 2003. "Do Lower Expected Wage Benefits Explain Ethnic Age Gaps in Job-Related Training? Evidence from New Zealand," Working Papers 03_03, Motu Economic and Public Policy Research.

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