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Education, Employment Status and Earnings: A Comparative Test of the Strong Screening Hypothesis

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  • Brown, Sarah
  • Sessions, John G

Abstract

The authors apply the comparative technique originated by K. I. Wolpin (1977) to discriminate between the 'weak' and 'strong' screening hypothesizes. Controlling for self-selection, they find evidence for weak, but not strong, screening. Copyright 1998 by Scottish Economic Society.

Suggested Citation

  • Brown, Sarah & Sessions, John G, 1998. "Education, Employment Status and Earnings: A Comparative Test of the Strong Screening Hypothesis," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 45(5), pages 586-591, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:scotjp:v:45:y:1998:i:5:p:586-91
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    Cited by:

    1. Joern H. Block & Marcus Wagner, 2010. "Necessity and Opportunity Entrepreneurs in Germany: Characteristics and Earning s Differentials," Schmalenbach Business Review (sbr), LMU Munich School of Management, vol. 62(2), pages 154-174, April.
    2. Carolina Castagnetti & Luisa Rosti, 2011. "Who skims the cream of the Italian graduate crop? Wage employment versus self-employment," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 36(2), pages 223-234, February.
    3. Andrew Clark, 2000. "Signalling and Screening in a Transition Economy: Three Empirical Models Applied to Russia," CERT Discussion Papers 0003, Centre for Economic Reform and Transformation, Heriot Watt University.
    4. Hornig, Stephan O. & Rottmann, Horst & Wapler, Rüdiger, 2009. "Information asymmetry, education signals and the case of Ethnic and Native Germans," IAB Discussion Paper 200914, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    5. Luisa Rosti & Chikara Yamaguchi & Carolina Castagnetti, 2005. "Educational Performance as Signalling Device: Evidence from Italy," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 9(4), pages 1-7.
    6. Colm Harmon & Hessel Oosterbeek & Ian Walker, 2000. "The returns to education : a review of evidence, issues and deficiencies in the literature," Open Access publications 10197/670, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
    7. Inmaculada García Mainar & Víctor M. Montuenga Gómez, 2004. "Returns to education and to experience within the EU: are there differences between wage earners and the self-employed?," Documentos de Trabajo dt2004-08, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales, Universidad de Zaragoza.
    8. Carolina Castagnetti & Luisa Rosti, 2010. "The Gender Gap in Academic Achievements of Italian Graduates," Quaderni di Dipartimento 118, University of Pavia, Department of Economics and Quantitative Methods.
    9. Brown, Sarah & Sessions, John G., 2006. "Evidence on the relationship between firm-based screening and the returns to education," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 25(5), pages 498-509, October.
    10. Carolina Castagnetti & Silvia Dal Bianco & Luisa Rosti, 2011. "Shortening university career fades the signal away. Evidence from Italy," Quaderni di Dipartimento 146, University of Pavia, Department of Economics and Quantitative Methods.
    11. Castagnetti, Carolina & Rosti, Luisa, 2009. "Effort allocation in tournaments: The effect of gender on academic performance in Italian universities," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 357-369, June.
    12. Tian Qiu & John Hudson, 2010. "Private returns to education in urban China," Economic Change and Restructuring, Springer, vol. 43(2), pages 131-150, May.
    13. Anu Tokila & Hannu Tervo, 2011. "Regional differences in returns to education for entrepreneurs versus wage earners," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 47(3), pages 689-710, December.
    14. repec:ucn:wpaper:10197/1099 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. Asplund, Rita & Pereira, Pedro Telhado (ed.), . "Returns to Human Capital in Europe. A Literature Review," ETLA B, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy, number 156, May.
    16. Pamela Lenton, 2016. "Staying-on after twenty-one: the returns to postgraduate education," Working Papers 2016004, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.

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