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The Behaviour of the Firm under Alternative Regulatory Constraints

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  • Burns, Philip
  • Turvey, Ralph
  • Weyman-Jones, Thomas G

Abstract

The authors review the case for intermediate power incentive regulation, such as sliding scale, when the regulator is badly informed and the firm's profits have a shadow resource cost. They then evaluate a number of different regulatory regimes, including sliding scale, in terms of productive and allocative efficiency. The authors find the sliding scale principle can be applied quite generally--to dividends, profits, or rate of return--and that it has attractive economic properties. Copyright 1998 by Scottish Economic Society.

Suggested Citation

  • Burns, Philip & Turvey, Ralph & Weyman-Jones, Thomas G, 1998. "The Behaviour of the Firm under Alternative Regulatory Constraints," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 45(2), pages 133-157, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:scotjp:v:45:y:1998:i:2:p:133-57
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Paolo Panteghini & Carlo Scarpa, 2008. "Political pressures and the credibility of regulation: can profit sharing mitigate regulatory risk?," International Review of Economics, Springer;Happiness Economics and Interpersonal Relations (HEIRS), vol. 55(3), pages 253-274, September.
    2. David Hawdon & Lester C. Hunt & Paul Levine & Neil Rickman, 2007. "Optimal sliding scale regulation: an application to regional electricity distribution in England and Wales," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 59(3), pages 458-485, July.
    3. Kennedy, David, 2002. "Regulatory reform and market development in power sectors of transition economies: the case of Kazakhstan," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 219-233, February.
    4. Terry Robinson, 2006. "The Revealed Preference of Regulatory Menus: Evidence from the Pre-Nationalisation British Gas Industry," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 20(2), pages 213-221.
    5. Iossa, Elisabetta & Stroffolini, Francesca, 2005. "Price cap regulation, revenue sharing and information acquisition," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 217-230, March.
    6. Carlo Scarpa & Paolo Panteghini, 2001. "Incentives to (Irreversible) Investments Under Different Regulatory Regimes," CESifo Working Paper Series 417, CESifo Group Munich.
    7. Paolo M. Panteghini & Carlo Scarpa, 2003. "Irreversible Investments and Regulatory Risk," CESifo Working Paper Series 934, CESifo Group Munich.
    8. Michele Moretto & Paolo M. Panteghini & Carlo Scarpa, 2003. "Investment Size and Firm’s Value Under Profit Sharing Regulation," Working Papers 2003.80, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.

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