IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this article

Does Financial Deregulation Cause a Consumption Boom?


  • Agell, Jonas
  • Berg, Lennart


According to a growing number of critics, the process of financial liberalization in the 1980s is to blame for the volatile macroeconomic development in a number of countries, including the United Kingdom and the Nordic countries. The authors examine how financial deregulation affected one important component of aggregate demand, private consumption. A main finding is that the Swedish consumption boom of the late 1980s can be explained along other lines than financial deregulation. The mid-1980s also constituted a period when real wage growth picked up and the authors' data are consistent with the simple idea that permanent income dynamics was an important factor. Copyright 1996 by The editors of the Scandinavian Journal of Economics.

Suggested Citation

  • Agell, Jonas & Berg, Lennart, 1996. " Does Financial Deregulation Cause a Consumption Boom?," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 98(4), pages 579-601, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:scandj:v:98:y:1996:i:4:p:579-601

    Download full text from publisher

    To our knowledge, this item is not available for download. To find whether it is available, there are three options:
    1. Check below whether another version of this item is available online.
    2. Check on the provider's web page whether it is in fact available.
    3. Perform a search for a similarly titled item that would be available.

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Kalemli-Ozcan, Sebnem & Ryder, Harl E. & Weil, David N., 2000. "Mortality decline, human capital investment, and economic growth," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(1), pages 1-23, June.
    2. Jones Charles I., 2001. "Was an Industrial Revolution Inevitable? Economic Growth Over the Very Long Run," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 1(2), pages 1-45, August.
    3. Oded Galor & David N. Weil, 1998. "Population, Technology, and Growth: From Malthusian Stagnation to the Demographic Transition," Working Papers 98-3, Brown University, Department of Economics, revised 19 Aug 1998.
    4. Heckman, James J, 1976. "A Life-Cycle Model of Earnings, Learning, and Consumption," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 84(4), pages 11-44, August.
    5. Boucekkine, Raouf & de la Croix, David & Licandro, Omar, 2002. "Vintage Human Capital, Demographic Trends, and Endogenous Growth," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 104(2), pages 340-375, June.
    6. Gary D. Hansen & Edward C. Prescott, 2002. "Malthus to Solow," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(4), pages 1205-1217, September.
    7. Stokey, Nancy L., 2001. "A quantitative model of the British industrial revolution, 1780-1850," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 55(1), pages 55-109, December.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Seppo Honkapohja & Erkki Koskela, 1999. "The economic crisis of the 1990s in Finland," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 14(29), pages 399-436, October.
    2. Manoel Bittencourt & Chance Mwabutwa & Nicola Viegi, 2012. "Financial Reforms and Consumption Behaviour in Malawi," Working Papers 201210, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    3. Muzafar Shah Habibullah & Peter Smith & W. N. W. Azman-Saini, 2006. "Testing liquidity constraints in 10 Asian developing countries: an error-correction model approach," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(21), pages 2535-2543.
    4. Lindberg, Sara, 1999. "Consumption and Capital Mobility in the Nordic Countries," Working Paper Series 1999:6, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
    5. Andersson, Fredrik W., 2011. "The lambda model and "rule of thumb" consumers: An estimation problem in existing studies," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 40(4), pages 381-384, August.
    6. Kashif Mansori, 2001. "Economic Liberalization and Savings Rates," CESifo Working Paper Series 418, CESifo Group Munich.
    7. Angelos A. Antzoulatos, 1997. "Non-linear consumption dynamics," Research Paper 9726, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    8. Egil Matsen & Øystein Thøgersen, 2000. "Financial Integration and Consumption Comovements in the Nordic Countries," Working Paper Series 1502, Department of Economics, Norwegian University of Science and Technology.

    More about this item


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:scandj:v:98:y:1996:i:4:p:579-601. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.