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Measures of Technology and the Short-run Response to Technology Shocks


  • Mikael Carlsson


Technology growth is estimated on data for Swedish two-digit manufacturing industries. I apply and evaluate two different approaches to control for varying factor utilization developed by Basu and Kimball (1997) and Burnside, Eichenbaum and Rebelo (1995). I also propose a generalization of the latter specification. The cyclical behavior of the resulting technology measure is studied and the responses of hours and output to a technology shock are estimated. The main finding is that a positive technology shock has, on impact, a contractionary effect on hours and a non-expansionary effect on output. This finding is inconsistent with the predictions of the canonical real business cycle model. Copyright The editors of the "Scandinavian Journal of Economics", 2003 .

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  • Mikael Carlsson, 2003. "Measures of Technology and the Short-run Response to Technology Shocks," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 105(4), pages 555-579, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:scandj:v:105:y:2003:i:4:p:555-579

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    6. Meese, Richard, 1980. "Dynamic factor demand schedules for labor and capital under rational expectations," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 14(1), pages 141-158, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Mikael Carlsson & Julián Messina & Oskar Nordström Skans, 2016. "Wage Adjustment and Productivity Shocks," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 126(595), pages 1739-1773, September.
    2. Tervala, Juha, 2007. "Technology Shocks and Employment in Open Economies," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), vol. 1, pages 1-27.
    3. Mikael Carlsson & Jon Smedsaas, 2007. "Technology Shocks and the Labor-Input Response: Evidence from Firm-Level Data," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 39(6), pages 1509-1520, September.
    4. Yongsung Chang & Jay H. Hong, 2006. "Do Technological Improvements in the Manufacturing Sector Raise or Lower Employment?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(1), pages 352-368, March.
    5. Carlsson, Mikael & Messina, Julián & Nordström Skans, Oskar, 2014. "Firm-level shocks and labor adjustments," Working Paper Series 2014:28, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    6. Lundin, Magnus & Gottfries, Nils & Lindström, Tomas, 2004. "Price and Investment Dynamics: An Empirical Analysis of Plant Level Data," Working Paper Series 2004:7, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
    7. Forslund, Anders & Gottfries, Nils & Westermark, Andreas, 2005. "Real and Nominal Wage Adjustment in Open Economies," Working Paper Series 2005:18, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
    8. Mikael Carlsson, 2007. "Investment and Uncertainty: A Theory-based Empirical Approach," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 69(5), pages 603-617, October.
    9. Bucht, Charlotte & Gottfries, Nils & Lundin, Magnus, 2002. "Why Don't Prices Fall in a Recession? Financial Constraints, Investment, and Customer Relations," Working Paper Series 2002:3, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
    10. Francesco Furlanetto & Martin Seneca, 2012. "Rule-of-Thumb Consumers, Productivity, and Hours," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 114(2), pages 658-679, June.
    11. Park, Kangwoo, 2012. "Employment responses to aggregate and sectoral technology shocks," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 801-821.
    12. Kim Jung-Wook & Chun Hyunbae, 2011. "Technology Shocks and Employment: Evidence from U.S. Firm-Level Data," The B.E. Journal of Macroeconomics, De Gruyter, vol. 11(1), pages 1-23, September.
    13. Tervala, Juha, 2007. "Technology Shocks and Employment in Open Economies," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), vol. 1, pages 1-27.
    14. Yongsung Chang & Jay H. Hong, 2003. "On the Employment Effect of Technology: Evidence from US Manufacturing for 1958-1996," PIER Working Paper Archive 03-004, Penn Institute for Economic Research, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania.

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