IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/scandj/v101y1999i1p115-26.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Optimal Tax-Transfer Systems and Redistributive Policy

Author

Listed:
  • Fellman, Johan
  • Jantti, Markus
  • Lambert, Peter J

Abstract

In this paper, the authors develop 'optimal yardsticks' to gauge the effectiveness of given tax and benefit policies in reducing inequality. They show that the conjunction of the optimal tax and optimal benefits policies constitutes the optimal tax-and-benefit policy, given the tax and benefit budget sizes. A decomposition formula enables trends in the inequality impact of taxes and benefits to be explained in terms of changing policy effectiveness (targeting) and budget size effects. The analysis incorporates a distributional judgement parameter, for sensitivity analysis, and concludes with an examination of the Finnish case for the period 1971-90. Copyright 1999 by The editors of the Scandinavian Journal of Economics.

Suggested Citation

  • Fellman, Johan & Jantti, Markus & Lambert, Peter J, 1999. " Optimal Tax-Transfer Systems and Redistributive Policy," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 101(1), pages 115-126, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:scandj:v:101:y:1999:i:1:p:115-26
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/servlet/useragent?func=synergy&synergyAction=showTOC&journalCode=sjoe&volume=101&issue=1&year=1999&part=null
    File Function: link to full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Thor O. Thoresen & Zhiyang Jia & Peter J. Lambert, 2013. "Distributional benchmarking in tax policy evaluations," Discussion Papers 765, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    2. Ali Enami, 2017. "Measuring the Effectiveness of Taxes and Transfers in Fighting Inequality and Poverty," Working Papers 1711, Tulane University, Department of Economics.
    3. Higgins, Sean & Lustig, Nora, 2016. "Can a poverty-reducing and progressive tax and transfer system hurt the poor?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 122(C), pages 63-75.
    4. Peter J. Lambert & Runa Nesbakken & Thor O. Thoresen, 2011. "On the meaning and measurement of redistribution in cross-country comparisons," Discussion Papers 649, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    5. Fellman, Johan, 2001. "Mathematical properties of classes of income redistributive policies," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 179-192, March.
    6. Johan Fellman, 2009. "Discontinuous transformations, Lorenz curves and transfer policies," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 33(2), pages 335-342, August.
    7. Ali Enami, 2016. "Measuring the Effectiveness of Taxes and transfers in Fighting Poverty and Inequality in Iran," Commitment to Equity (CEQ) Working Paper Series 1358, Tulane University, Department of Economics.
    8. Ali Enami, 2016. "An Application of the CEQ Effectiveness Indicators: The Case of Iran," Commitment to Equity (CEQ) Working Paper Series 58, Tulane University, Department of Economics.
    9. Ivica Urban, 2009. "Kakwani decomposition of redistributive effect: Origins, critics and upgrades," Working Papers 148, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    10. Higgins, Sean & Lustig, Nora, 2016. "Can a poverty-reducing and progressive tax and transfer system hurt the poor?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 122(C), pages 63-75.
    11. Peter Lambert & Thor Thoresen & Runa Nesbakken, 2010. "On the Meaning and Measurement of Redistribution in Cross-Country Comparisons," LIS Working papers 532, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:scandj:v:101:y:1999:i:1:p:115-26. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1467-9442 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.