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Time and Economic Well-Being--A Panel Analysis of Desired versus Actual Working Hours

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  • Merz, Joachim

Abstract

Individual well-being has its resources by income and time. Though income traditionally is on the focuses of well-being analyses, the connected time dimension is often neglected. One important dimension of individual welfare regarding time and income is the possibility to harmonize desired with actual working hours connected with the income dimension. This paper will analyze this working hour tension by a ten year panel analysis for Germany. Besides descriptive measures of the subjective tension over a decade from the mid 1980s to the mid 1990s, the panel econometric analyses will quantify personal and household influences in explaining the working hour tension as one further important economic well-being measure. Copyright 2002 by The International Association for Research in Income and Wealth.

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  • Merz, Joachim, 2002. "Time and Economic Well-Being--A Panel Analysis of Desired versus Actual Working Hours," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 48(3), pages 317-346, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:revinw:v:48:y:2002:i:3:p:317-46
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    Cited by:

    1. Bonke, Jens & Schultz-Nielsen, Marie Louise, 2014. "Do Preferences Impact Behavior and Wellbeing? A Panel Study of Preferred and Actual Working Time 2001-2008/09," IZA Discussion Papers 8356, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Joachim Merz & Tim Rathjen, 2014. "Time And Income Poverty: An Interdependent Multidimensional Poverty Approach With German Time Use Diary Data," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 60(3), pages 450-479, September.
    3. Robert Drago & Mark Wooden & David Black, 2009. "Long Work Hours: Volunteers and Conscripts," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 47(3), pages 571-600, September.
    4. Steffen Otterbach, 2010. "Mismatches Between Actual and Preferred Work Time: Empirical Evidence of Hours Constraints in 21 Countries," Journal of Consumer Policy, Springer, vol. 33(2), pages 143-161, June.
    5. Weber, Enzo & Zimmert, Franziska, 2017. "The creation and resolution of working hour discrepancies over the life course," IAB Discussion Paper 201729, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    6. Ragni Hege Kitterød & Marit Rønsen, 2011. "Housewives in a dual-earner society. Who is a housewife in contemporary Norway?," Discussion Papers 659, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    7. Wanger, Susanne, 2017. "What makes employees satisfied with their working time? : The role of working hours, time-sovereignty and working conditions for working time and job satisfaction," IAB Discussion Paper 201720, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    8. Joachim Merz & Dominik Hanglberger & Rafael Rucha, 2010. "The Timing of Daily Demand for Goods and Services—Microsimulation Policy Results of an Aging Society, Increasing Labour Market Flexibility, and Extended Public Childcare in Germany," Journal of Consumer Policy, Springer, vol. 33(2), pages 119-141, June.
    9. Arndt Werner & Johanna Gast & Sascha Kraus, 2014. "The effect of working time preferences and fair wage perceptions on entrepreneurial intentions among employees," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 43(1), pages 137-160, June.

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