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Intergenerational Income Mobility in Sweden: What Do Tax-Data Show?

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  • Osterberg, Torun

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to investigate intergenerational income mobility in Sweden by means of a representative sample drawn from tax-data files. Longitudinal data on actual parent-child pairs spanning 1978-92 are employed. Regression and correlation coefficients are analyzed and transition matrices calculated in order to investigate income mobility over generations. The results achieved show high intergenerational income mobility in Sweden between fathers and sons in comparison to estimations performed in most other countries and more especially compared to the U.S. This indicates that Sweden does not only have lower cross-sectional income inequality, but also higher intergenerational income mobility than those countries. The mother's earnings influence children's earnings less than the father's. However, the mother's earnings correlate more strongly with a daughter's earnings than they do with that of a son. The major indication of immobility across generations is found in the upper income deciles. Copyright 2000 by The International Association for Research in Income and Wealth.

Suggested Citation

  • Osterberg, Torun, 2000. "Intergenerational Income Mobility in Sweden: What Do Tax-Data Show?," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 46(4), pages 421-436, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:revinw:v:46:y:2000:i:4:p:421-36
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    Cited by:

    1. Maia Güell & José V. Rodríguez Mora & Christopher I. Telmer, 2015. "The Informational Content of Surnames, the Evolution of Intergenerational Mobility, and Assortative Mating," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 82(2), pages 693-735.
    2. Viviane Azevedo & César P. Bouillon, 2009. "Social Mobility in Latin America: A Review of Existing Evidence," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 1656, Inter-American Development Bank.
    3. Maia Güell & José V. Rodríguez Mora & Christopher I. Telmer, 2014. "Intergenerational Mobility and the Informational Content of Surnames," Working Papers 2014-01, FEDEA.
    4. Bratberg, Espen & Nilsen, Øivind Anti & Vaage, Kjell, 2005. "Intergenerational Mobility: Trends Across the Earnings Distribution," Working Papers in Economics 04/05, University of Bergen, Department of Economics.
    5. Guell, Maia & Rodriguez Mora, Jose V. & Telmer, Chris, 2007. "Intergenerational mobility and the informative content of surnames," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 19701, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    6. Lena Lindahl, 2008. "Do birth order and family size matter for intergenerational income mobility? Evidence from Sweden," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(17), pages 2239-2257.
    7. Bjorklund, Anders & Chadwick, Laura, 2003. "Intergenerational income mobility in permanent and separated families," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 80(2), pages 239-246, August.
    8. Jere R. Behrman & Alejandro Gaviria & Miguel Székely, 2001. "Intergenerational Mobility in Latin America," ECONOMIA JOURNAL, THE LATIN AMERICAN AND CARIBBEAN ECONOMIC ASSOCIATION - LACEA, vol. 0(Fall 2001), pages 1-44, August.
    9. Hirvonen, Lalaina, 2006. "Intergenerational Earnings Mobility Among Daughters and Sons: Evidence from Sweden and a Comparison with the United States," Working Paper Series 5/2006, Stockholm University, Swedish Institute for Social Research.
    10. Björklund, Anders, 2006. "Family Background and Outcomes Later in Life: A (Partial and Personal) Survey of Recent Research Using Swedish Register Data," Working Paper Series 4/2007, Stockholm University, Swedish Institute for Social Research.
    11. Jere R. Behrman & Alejandro Gaviria & Miguel Székely, 2001. "Movilidad intergeneracional en América Latina," Research Department Publications 4268, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    12. Lina Andersson & Mats Hammarstedt, 2011. "Transmission of self-employment across immigrant generations: the importance of ethnic background and gender," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 9(4), pages 555-577, December.
    13. Gary Solon, 2002. "Cross-Country Differences in Intergenerational Earnings Mobility," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 16(3), pages 59-66, Summer.
    14. Maribel Jiménez, 2011. "Un Análisis Empírico de las No Linealidades en la Movilidad Intergeneracional del Ingreso. El caso de la Argentina," CEDLAS, Working Papers 0114, CEDLAS, Universidad Nacional de La Plata.
    15. Raaum Oddbjørn & Bratsberg Bernt & Røed Knut & Österbacka Eva & Eriksson Tor & Jäntti Markus & Naylor Robin A, 2008. "Marital Sorting, Household Labor Supply, and Intergenerational Earnings Mobility across Countries," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 7(2), pages 1-49, January.
    16. William Nilsson, 2013. "Estimating Nonlinear Intergenerational Income Mobility with Correlation Curves," DEA Working Papers 57, Universitat de les Illes Balears, Departament d'Economía Aplicada.
    17. Haile, Getinet Astatike, 2016. "Intergenerational Mobility in Income and Economic Status in Ethiopia," IZA Discussion Papers 10047, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    18. Holmlund, Helena, 2006. "Intergenerational Mobility and Assortative Mating. Effects of an Educational Reform," Working Paper Series 4/2006, Stockholm University, Swedish Institute for Social Research.
    19. Bratberg, Espen & Nilsen, Øivind Anti & Vaage, Kjell, 2002. "Assessing Changes in Intergenerational Earnings Mobility," Working Papers in Economics 26/02, University of Bergen, Department of Economics.
    20. repec:bla:revinw:v:63:y:2017:i:2:p:219-233 is not listed on IDEAS
    21. Corak, Miles, 2006. "Do Poor Children Become Poor Adults? Lessons from a Cross Country Comparison of Generational Earnings Mobility," IZA Discussion Papers 1993, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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