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Households' Non-SNA Production: Labour Time, Value of Labour and of Product, and Contribution to Extended Private Consumption


  • Goldschmidt-Clermont, Luisella
  • Pagnossin-Aligisakis, Elisabetta


This paper first shows, with data from fourteen countries, the potential of time-use studies for measuring, in comparable physical quantities, labour inputs in SNA and in non-SNA production. It then presents the monetary valuations of unpaid household labour and of households' non-market product achieved on the basis of time-use data in a few of these countries. Further elaboration of these valuations illustrates the contribution of households' non-SNA production to extended private consumption. The conclusion suggests desirable future developments. Copyright 1999 by The International Association for Research in Income and Wealth.

Suggested Citation

  • Goldschmidt-Clermont, Luisella & Pagnossin-Aligisakis, Elisabetta, 1999. "Households' Non-SNA Production: Labour Time, Value of Labour and of Product, and Contribution to Extended Private Consumption," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 45(4), pages 519-529, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:revinw:v:45:y:1999:i:4:p:519-29

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Charles Blackorby & David Donaldson & Maria Auersperg, 1981. "A New Procedure for the Measurement of Inequality within and among Population Subgroups," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 14(4), pages 665-685, November.
    2. Stephen P. Jenkins, 1991. "Income Inequality and Living standards: Changes in the 1970s and 1980s," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 12(1), pages 1-28, February.
    3. Kolm, Serge-Christophe, 1976. "Unequal inequalities. II," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 13(1), pages 82-111, August.
    4. Amiel, Yoram & Cowell, Frank A., 1992. "Measurement of income inequality : Experimental test by questionnaire," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(1), pages 3-26, February.
    5. Kolm, Serge-Christophe, 1976. "Unequal inequalities. I," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 12(3), pages 416-442, June.
    6. Blundell,R. W. & Preston,Ian & Walker,Ian (ed.), 1994. "The Measurement of Household Welfare," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521451956, March.
    7. Peña, Daniel & Ruiz-Castillo, Javier, 1995. "Inflation and inequality bias in the presence of bulk purchases for food and drinks," DES - Working Papers. Statistics and Econometrics. WS 4514, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Estadística.
    8. Javier Ruiz-Castillo, 1995. "Income distribution and social welfare: a review essay," Investigaciones Economicas, Fundación SEPI, vol. 19(1), pages 3-34, January.
    9. Lewbel, Arthur, 1989. "Household equivalence scales and welfare comparisons," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(3), pages 377-391, August.
    10. John Muellbauer, 1974. "Inequality Measures, Prices and Household Composition," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 41(4), pages 493-504.
    11. Slesnick, Daniel T, 1991. "The Standard of Living in the United States," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 37(4), pages 363-386, December.
    12. Slesnick, Daniel T, 1993. "Gaining Ground: Poverty in the Postwar United States," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(1), pages 1-38, February.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:eee:joecag:v:5:y:2015:i:c:p:33-44 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:eee:ecolec:v:143:y:2018:i:c:p:141-152 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Gianna C. Giannelli & Lucia Mangiavacchi & Luca Piccoli, 2012. "GDP and the value of family caretaking: how much does Europe care?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(16), pages 2111-2131, June.
    4. Denys Dukhovnov & Emilio Zagheni, 2015. "Who Takes Care of Whom in the United States? Time Transfers by Age and Sex," Population and Development Review, The Population Council, Inc., vol. 41(2), pages 183-206, June.

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