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International Financial Liberalization, Corruption, and Economic Growth

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  • Rivera-Batiz, Francisco L

Abstract

This paper examines the effects of capital account liberalization on the long-run growth of a developing economy. A general-equilibrium, endogenous growth model is constructed in which corruption forms an integral part of the governance system of the country. By undermining the profitability of innovations, corruption lowers the rate of return to capital and reduces the rate of technological change. The impact of international financial liberalization on long-run growth in this model can be either positive or negative. A drop in growth is obtained when the level of corruption is high enough to cause domestic rates of return to capital before liberalization to drop below those in the rest of the world. In this case, liberalization generates capital outflows, which act as a constraining force on innovation, reducing the rate of technological change and lowering output growth. On the other hand, if the level of corruption is sufficiently low, the capital account liberalization will serve as a boost to the country's technical change and growth. Copyright 2001 by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

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  • Rivera-Batiz, Francisco L, 2001. "International Financial Liberalization, Corruption, and Economic Growth," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 9(4), pages 727-737, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:reviec:v:9:y:2001:i:4:p:727-37
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    Cited by:

    1. Blackburn, Keith & Forgues-Puccio, Gonzalo F., 2009. "Why is corruption less harmful in some countries than in others?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 72(3), pages 797-810, December.
    2. Blackburn, Keith & Forgues-Puccio, Gonzalo F., 2010. "Financial liberalization, bureaucratic corruption and economic development," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 29(7), pages 1321-1339, November.
    3. Qing Liu & Ruosi Lu & Xiangjun Ma, 2015. "Corruption, Financial Resources and Exports," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 23(5), pages 1023-1043, November.
    4. Chari, Anusha & Blair Henry, Peter, 2008. "Firm-specific information and the efficiency of investment," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 87(3), pages 636-655, March.
    5. Peter Henry, 2007. "Capital Account Liberalization: Theory, Evidence, and Speculation," Discussion Papers 07-004, Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research.
    6. Luis Angeles, 2005. "Capital Account Openness and Bankruptcies," The School of Economics Discussion Paper Series 0542, Economics, The University of Manchester.
    7. Luis Angeles, "undated". "Monetary Policy and the Stock Market: Some International evidence," Working Papers 2006_13, Business School - Economics, University of Glasgow.
    8. Keith Blackburn & Niloy Bose & M. Emranul Haque, 2011. "Public Expenditures, Bureaucratic Corruption And Economic Development," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 79(3), pages 405-428, June.
    9. Bertrand Venard, 2009. "Corruption in emerging countries: A matter of isomorphism," Post-Print hal-00771103, HAL.
    10. Bertrand Venard & Mohamed Hanafi, 2008. "Organizational Isomorphism and Corruption in Financial Institutions: Empirical Research in Emerging Countries," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 81(2), pages 481-498, August.
    11. Barry Bosworth, 2005. "Managing Capital Inflows: What Have We Learned?," Papers Presented at Global Meetings of the Emerging Markets Forum 2005inflows, Emerging Markets Forum.
    12. repec:eur:ejesjr:178 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Sionfou Seydou Coulibaly & Lewis Landry Gakpa, 2017. "The Role of Property Rights in the Relationship between Openness to International Capital Flows and Economic Growth in Sub-Saharan Africa Countries: An Estimate from Non-Stationary Panel Data," Research Papers RP_320, African Economic Research Consortium.
    14. Blackburn, Keith & Forgues-Puccio, Gonzalo F., 2006. "Financial Liberalisation, Bureaucratic Corruption and Economic," Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Berlin 2006 8, Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics.

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