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Trade and Environment: Bargaining Outcomes from Linked Negotiations

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  • Abrego, Lisandro, et al

Abstract

Some recent literature has explored physical and policy linkages between trade and the environment. This paper explores linkage through leverage in bargaining, whereby developed countries can use trade threats to achieve improved developing-country environmental management, while developing countries can use environmental concessions to achieve trade discipline in developed countries. A global numerical simulation model is used to compute bargaining outcomes from linked trade and environment negotiations. Results indicate joint gains from expanding the trade bargaining set to include the environment. However, compared with bargaining with cash side-payments, linked negotiations on policy instruments provide significantly inferior outcomes for developing countries. Copyright 2001 by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

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  • Abrego, Lisandro, et al, 2001. "Trade and Environment: Bargaining Outcomes from Linked Negotiations," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 9(3), pages 414-428, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:reviec:v:9:y:2001:i:3:p:414-28
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    Cited by:

    1. Thomas Kuhn & Radomir Pestow & Anja Zenker, 2018. "Endogenous Climate Coalitions and Free Trade - Building the Missing Link," Chemnitz Economic Papers 018, Department of Economics, Chemnitz University of Technology.
    2. Limao, Nuno, 2005. "Trade policy, cross-border externalities and lobbies: do linked agreements enforce more cooperative outcomes?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(1), pages 175-199, September.
    3. Markusen, James R., 2012. "Per-Capita Income as a Determinant of International Trade and Environmental Policies," Discussion Papers 2013-06, Graduate School of Economics, Hitotsubashi University.
    4. Henrik Horn & Petros C. Mavroidis, 2014. "Multilateral environmental agreements in the WTO: Silence speaks volumes," International Journal of Economic Theory, The International Society for Economic Theory, vol. 10(1), pages 147-166, March.
    5. Conconi, Paola & Perroni, Carlo, 2002. "Issue linkage and issue tie-in in multilateral negotiations," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(2), pages 423-447, August.
    6. John Whalley, 2011. "What Role for Trade in a Post‐2012 Global Climate Policy Regime," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 34(11), pages 1844-1862, November.
    7. James R. Markusen, 2014. "Per-Capital Income as a Determinant of International Trade and Environment Policies," CESifo Working Paper Series 4618, CESifo Group Munich.
    8. Hirbod Assa & Sheridon Elliston & Ehud Lehrer, 2016. "Joint games and compatibility," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 61(1), pages 91-113, January.
    9. Jale Tosun & Christoph Knill, 2011. "The Differential Impact of Economic Integration on Environmental Policy," Chapters,in: International Handbook on the Economics of Integration, Volume III, chapter 12 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    10. Tai-Liang Chen & Leonard Wang, 2010. "Trade liberalization and transboundary pollution in an international mixed duopoly," Environmental Economics and Policy Studies, Springer;Society for Environmental Economics and Policy Studies - SEEPS, vol. 12(4), pages 187-200, December.
    11. Li, Chunding & Whalley, John, 2014. "China's potential future growth and gains from trade policy bargaining: Some numerical simulation results," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 65-78.
    12. Wolfgang Buchholz & Alexander Haupt & Wolfgang Peters, 2013. "International Environmental Agreements, Fiscal Federalism, and Constitutional Design," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 21(4), pages 705-718, September.
    13. Myriam Anna Scaringelli, 2011. "Commercio Internazionale E Ambiente: Un’Analisi A Livello Provinciale," Quaderni DSEMS 06-2011, Dipartimento di Scienze Economiche, Matematiche e Statistiche, Universita' di Foggia.
    14. Chunding Li, 2017. "How Would Bilateral Trade Retaliation Affect China?," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 49(3), pages 459-479, March.
    15. Paola Conconi & Carlo Perroni, 2005. "Conditionality, Separation, and Open Rules in Multilateral Institutions," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/5843, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
    16. Ederington, Josh & McCalman, Phillip, 2003. "Discriminatory tariffs and international negotiations," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(2), pages 397-424, December.
    17. Lai, Yu-Bong & Hu, Chia-Hsien, 2008. "Trade agreements, domestic environmental regulation, and transboundary pollution," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 209-228, May.
    18. Thomas Kuhn & Radomir Pestow & Anja Zenker, 2017. "Building Climate Coalitions on Preferential Free Trade Agreements," Chemnitz Economic Papers 011, Department of Economics, Chemnitz University of Technology, revised Jul 2017.
    19. Nuno Limão, 2016. "Preferential Trade Agreements," NBER Working Papers 22138, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

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