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Environmental Quality and Industry Protection with Noncooperative versus Cooperative Domestic and Trade Policies

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  • Schleich, Joachim
  • Orden, David

Abstract

This paper characterizes environmental quality and industry protection in a large-country Grossman-Helpman model when production or consumption externalities exist and governments decide noncooperatively or cooperatively on domestic and trade policies. Governments choose policies efficiently from among those available, but competitive lobbies may prefer less efficient regimes. Under restricted policy availability, political-support effects can offset terms-of-trade effects on equilibrium outcomes, and inefficient trade policies can lead to higher environmental quality than efficient domestic policies. If governments cooperate, they can satisfy particular organized industries at lower costs to other lobbies and total welfare. This may result in lower environmental quality than noncooperation. Copyright 2000 by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Suggested Citation

  • Schleich, Joachim & Orden, David, 2000. "Environmental Quality and Industry Protection with Noncooperative versus Cooperative Domestic and Trade Policies," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 8(4), pages 681-697, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:reviec:v:8:y:2000:i:4:p:681-97
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    Cited by:

    1. Per G. Fredriksson & Xenia Matschke, 2016. "Trade Liberalization and Environmental Taxation in Federal Systems," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, pages 150-167.
    2. Gulati Sumeet, 2010. "Price and Quantity Policies in a Simple Political Economy Framework," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, pages 1-16.
    3. Javier Biscarri & Fernando Gracia, 2004. "Stock market cycles and stock market development in Spain," Spanish Economic Review, Springer;Spanish Economic Association, pages 127-151.
    4. McAusland, Carol, 2008. "Trade, politics, and the environment: Tailpipe vs. smokestack," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 55(1), pages 52-71, January.
    5. Yu-Bong Lai, 2006. "Interest Groups, Trade Liberalization, and Environmental Standards," Environmental & Resource Economics, Springer;European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, pages 269-290.
    6. Jordi Brandts & Antonio Cabrales & Gary Charness, 2003. "Forward induction and the excess capacity puzzle: An experimental investigation," UFAE and IAE Working Papers 586.03, Unitat de Fonaments de l'Anàlisi Econòmica (UAB) and Institut d'Anàlisi Econòmica (CSIC).
    7. Yu-Bong Lai, 2007. "The political economy linkage between trade liberalization and domestic environmental regulations," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 133(1), pages 57-72, October.
    8. Persson, Lars, 2012. "Environmental policy and lobbying in small open economies," Resource and Energy Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(1), pages 24-35.
    9. repec:got:cegedp:65 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Sturm, Daniel & Ulph, Alistair, 2002. "Environment, trade, political economy and imperfect information: a survey," Discussion Paper Series In Economics And Econometrics 0204, Economics Division, School of Social Sciences, University of Southampton.
    11. Taner Güney, 2015. "Environmental sustainability and pressure groups," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, pages 2331-2344.
    12. Sturm, Daniel & Ulph, Alistair, 2002. "Environment, trade, political economy and imperfect information: a survey," Discussion Paper Series In Economics And Econometrics 204, Economics Division, School of Social Sciences, University of Southampton.
    13. Stoschek, Barbara, 2007. "The political economy of environmental regulations and industry compensation," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 65, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    14. McAusland, Carol, 2005. "Harmonizing tailpipe policy in symmetric countries: Improve the environment, improve welfare?," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 50(2), pages 229-251, September.
    15. Joachim Fuenfgelt & Guenther G. Schulze, 2011. "Endogenous Environmental Policy when Pollution is Transboundary," Discussion Paper Series 14, Department of International Economic Policy, University of Freiburg, revised Feb 2011.
    16. Fünfgelt, Joachim & Schulze, Günther G., 2016. "Endogenous environmental policy for small open economies with transboundary pollution," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 294-310.
    17. Y. Hossein Farzin & Jinhua Zhao, 2003. "Pollution Abatement Investment When Firms Lobby Against Environmental Regulation," Working Papers 2003.82, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.

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