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The Agency Cost of Internal Collusion and Schumpeterian Growth

  • David Martimort
  • Thierry Verdier

This paper analyses the link between the internal organization of the firm andthe growth process. We present a Schumpeterian growth model in whichmonopoly firms face agency costs due to collusion between managers insidethe organization. These costs affect incentives to invest and the rate ofinnovation in the economy. When collusion is self-enforcing, higher growth andmore creative destruction shortens in turn the time horizon of colludingagents in the organization and makes internal collusion more difficult tosustain. We analyse this two-way mechanism between growth and agencyproblems and show how the transaction costs of side-contracting within thefirm and the growth rate of the economy are simultaneously derived. Copyright The Review of Economic Studies Limited, 2004.

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Article provided by Wiley Blackwell in its journal Review of Economic Studies.

Volume (Year): 71 (2004)
Issue (Month): 4 (October)
Pages: 1119-1141

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Handle: RePEc:bla:restud:v:71:y:2004:i:4:p:1119-1141
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  1. Patrick Francois & Joanne Roberts, 2003. "Contracting Productivity Growth," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 70(1), pages 59-85, January.
  2. Drew Fudenberg & David K. Levine & Eric Maskin, 1994. "The Folk Theorem with Imperfect Public Information," Levine's Working Paper Archive 394, David K. Levine.
  3. Stein, Jeremy C, 1997. "Waves of Creative Destruction: Firm-Specific Learning-by-Doing and the Dynamics of Innovation," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 64(2), pages 265-88, April.
  4. Myerson, Roger B, 1979. "Incentive Compatibility and the Bargaining Problem," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 47(1), pages 61-73, January.
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  6. Jean Tirole, 1985. "Hierarchies and Bureaucracies," Working papers 363, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
  7. Aghion, Philippe & Dewatripont, Mathias & Rey, Patrick, 1999. "Competition, Financial Discipline and Growth," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 66(4), pages 825-52, October.
  8. Aghion, Philippe & Howitt, Peter, 1992. "A Model of Growth through Creative Destruction," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 60(2), pages 323-51, March.
  9. Eric Maskin, 1998. "Nash Equilibrium and Welfare Optimality," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1829, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
  10. Acemoglu, Daron & Zilibotti, Fabrizio, 1999. " Information Accumulation in Development," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 4(1), pages 5-38, March.
  11. David Thesmar & Mathias Thoenig, 2000. "Creative Destruction And Firm Organization Choice," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 115(4), pages 1201-1237, November.
  12. Martimort, David, 1999. "The Life Cycle of Regulatory Agencies: Dynamic Capture and Transaction Costs," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 66(4), pages 929-47, October.
  13. Jonathan Levin, 2000. "Relational Incentive Contracts," Working Papers 01002, Stanford University, Department of Economics.
  14. Bernheim, B. Douglas & Peleg, Bezalel & Whinston, Michael D., 1987. "Coalition-Proof Nash Equilibria I. Concepts," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 42(1), pages 1-12, June.
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