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Do Owners Take Better Care of Their Housing Than Renters?

Author

Listed:
  • John Harding
  • Thomas J. Miceli
  • C.F. Sirmans

Abstract

According to conventional wisdom, homeowners take better care of their housing than do renters, as a result of the rental externality. We argue that two forms of homeowner externality ootentially create similar incentives for owners to undermaintain their housing. The first is due to the inability of prospective buyers to fully observe past seller maintenance, and the second is a result of the limited liability of borrowers in the event of mortgage default. Empirical analysis verifies the existence of the mortgage externality, but we find no evidence for the resale externality. Copyright American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association.

Suggested Citation

  • John Harding & Thomas J. Miceli & C.F. Sirmans, 2000. "Do Owners Take Better Care of Their Housing Than Renters?," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 28(4), pages 663-681.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:reesec:v:28:y:2000:i:4:p:663-681
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Jonathan Halket & Lars Nesheim & Florian Oswald, 2015. "The housing stock, housing prices, and user costs: The roles of location, structure and unobserved quality," Sciences Po publications cwp73/15, Sciences Po.
    2. Coulson, N. Edward & Li, Herman, 2013. "Measuring the external benefits of homeownership," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 77(C), pages 57-67.
    3. Jeremy R. Groves & William H. Rogers, 2011. "Effectiveness of RCA Institutions to Limit Local Externalities: Using Foreclosure Data to Test Covenant Effectiveness," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 87(4), pages 559-581.
    4. Elias Oikarinen, 2008. "Empirical application of the housing-market no-arbitrage condition: problems, solutions and a Finnish case study," Discussion Papers 39, Aboa Centre for Economics.
    5. Anthony Pennington-Cross, 2006. "The Value of Foreclosed Property," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 28(2), pages 193-214.
    6. Sock-Yong Phang, 2010. "Affordable homeownership policy: Implications for housing markets," International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 3(1), pages 38-52, March.
    7. Michal Rubaszek & Margarita Rubio, 2017. "Does rental housing market stabilize the economy? A micro and macro perspective," Discussion Papers 2017/06, University of Nottingham, Centre for Finance, Credit and Macroeconomics (CFCM).
    8. William H. Rogers & William Winter, 2009. "The Impact of Foreclosures on Neighboring Housing Sales," Journal of Real Estate Research, American Real Estate Society, vol. 31(4), pages 455-480.
    9. Harding, John P. & Rosenblatt, Eric & Yao, Vincent W., 2009. "The contagion effect of foreclosed properties," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(3), pages 164-178, November.
    10. Dietz, Robert D. & Haurin, Donald R., 2003. "The social and private micro-level consequences of homeownership," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(3), pages 401-450, November.
    11. Harding, John P. & Miceli, Thomas J. & Sirmans, C. F., 2000. "Deficiency Judgments and Borrower Maintenance: Theory and Evidence," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 9(4), pages 267-285, December.
    12. repec:eee:irlaec:v:51:y:2017:i:c:p:12-22 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Joanne W. Hsu & David A. Matsa & Brian T. Melzer, 2014. "Positive Externalities of Social Insurance: Unemployment Insurance and Consumer Credit," NBER Working Papers 20353, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    14. Iwata, Shinichiro & Yamaga, Hisaki, 2008. "Rental externality, tenure security, and housing quality," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 201-211, September.
    15. Zhang, Lei & Leonard, Tammy, 2014. "Neighborhood impact of foreclosure: A quantile regression approach," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(C), pages 133-143.
    16. Engelhardt, Gary V. & Eriksen, Michael D. & Gale, William G. & Mills, Gregory B., 2010. "What are the social benefits of homeownership? Experimental evidence for low-income households," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(3), pages 249-258, May.
    17. Alex Chinco & Christopher Mayer, 2014. "Misinformed Speculators and Mispricing in the Housing Market," NBER Working Papers 19817, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    18. Arnold, Lutz G. & Babl, Andreas, 2014. "Alas, my home is my castle: On the cost of house ownership as a screening device," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 81(C), pages 57-64.
    19. Yong Tu & Helen X.H. Bao, 2009. "Property Rights and Housing Value: The Impacts of Political Instability," Real Estate Economics, American Real Estate and Urban Economics Association, vol. 37(2), pages 235-257.
    20. Kate Sabatini & Christian E. Weller, 2007. "Changes in Homeowners’ Financial Security during the Recent Housing and Mortgage Boom," Working Papers wp125, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
    21. Keith Ihlanfeldt & Tom Mayock, 2016. "The Impact of REO Sales on Neighborhoods and Their Residents," The Journal of Real Estate Finance and Economics, Springer, vol. 53(3), pages 282-324, October.
    22. Jonathan Halket & Lars Nesheim & Florian Oswald, 2015. "The housing stock, housing prices, and user costs: the roles of location, structure and unobserved quality," CeMMAP working papers CWP73/15, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    23. repec:eee:regeco:v:66:y:2017:i:c:p:150-174 is not listed on IDEAS

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