IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/bla/rdevec/v1y1997i3p324-36.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Export Bans, Environmental Protection, and Unemployment

Author

Listed:
  • Dean, Judith M
  • Gangopadhyay, Shubhashis

Abstract

This study investigates the case for an export ban on intermediate goods which generate environmental damage. Since export restrictions on intermediates have long been advocated as a method of stimulating domestic industries in developing countries, we consider whether the case for an export ban is strengthened or weakened by the presence of unemployment in the industrial sector. We find that, in the short run, an export restriction worsens unemployment, thus weakening the case for a ban. In the long run, however, the results are reversed. If the environmental problem is severe, unemployment has a negligible impact on the case for an export ban. Copyright 1997 by Blackwell Publishing Ltd

Suggested Citation

  • Dean, Judith M & Gangopadhyay, Shubhashis, 1997. "Export Bans, Environmental Protection, and Unemployment," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 1(3), pages 324-336, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:rdevec:v:1:y:1997:i:3:p:324-36
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/servlet/useragent?func=synergy&synergyAction=showTOC&journalCode=rode&volume=1&issue=3&year=1997&part=null
    File Function: link to full text
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. anonymous, 1995. "Does the bouncing ball lead to economic growth?," Regional Update, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, pages 1-2,4-6.
    2. Xiaokai Yang, 2006. "Development, Structural Changes And Urbanization," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: Inframarginal Contributions To Development Economics, chapter 7, pages 137-166 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    3. Kreps, David M & Wilson, Robert, 1982. "Sequential Equilibria," Econometrica, Econometric Society, pages 863-894.
    4. Philippe Aghion & Patrick Bolton & Christopher Harris & Bruno Jullien, 1991. "Optimal Learning by Experimentation," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, pages 621-654.
    5. Robert J. Barro, 2012. "Inflation and Economic Growth," CEMA Working Papers 568, China Economics and Management Academy, Central University of Finance and Economics.
    6. Robert J. Barro, 2013. "Inflation and Economic Growth," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, pages 121-144.
    7. Murphy, Kevin M & Shleifer, Andrei & Vishny, Robert W, 1989. "Industrialization and the Big Push," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 97(5), pages 1003-1026, October.
    8. Grossman, Gene M & Helpman, Elhanan, 1989. "Product Development and International Trade," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 97(6), pages 1261-1283, December.
    9. Romer, Paul M, 1990. "Endogenous Technological Change," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 98(5), pages 71-102, October.
    10. John Conlisk, 1996. "Why Bounded Rationality?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, pages 669-700.
    11. Xiaokai Yang & Jeff Borland, 2005. "A Microeconomic Mechanism For Economic Growth," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: An Inframarginal Approach To Trade Theory, chapter 18, pages 409-436 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    12. Richard R. Nelson, 1995. "Recent Evolutionary Theorizing about Economic Change," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, pages 48-90.
    13. Young, Allyn A., 1928. "Increasing Returns and Economic Progress," History of Economic Thought Articles, McMaster University Archive for the History of Economic Thought, pages 527-542.
    14. Xavier Sala-i-Martin, 1995. "Transfers, social safety nets and economic growth," Economics Working Papers 139, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
    15. Sanford Grossman, 1989. "The Informational Role of Prices," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262572141, January.
    16. Xiaokai Yang & Jeff Borland, 2005. "A Microeconomic Mechanism For Economic Growth," World Scientific Book Chapters,in: An Inframarginal Approach To Trade Theory, chapter 18, pages 409-436 World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd..
    17. Xavier Sala-I-Martin, 1997. "Transfers, Social Safety Nets, and Economic Growth," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 44(1), pages 81-102, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Gilbert, John & Wahl, Thomas, 2001. "Export restrictions, urban unemployment, and the location of processing activities," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 71(1), pages 105-110, April.
    2. Li, Xiaochun & Zhou, Jing, 2015. "Environmental effects of remittance of rural–urban migrant," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 174-179.
    3. Pierre-Louis Vézina, 2015. "Illegal trade in natural resources: Evidence from missing exports," International Economics, CEPII research center, issue 142, pages 152-160.
    4. repec:oxf:wpaper:oxcarre-research-paper-139 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Arief Anshory Yusuf, 2005. "Who Pay for the Cleaner Air? Distributional Impact of Environmental Policy in a Dualistic Economy," Working Papers in Economics and Development Studies (WoPEDS) 200502, Department of Economics, Padjadjaran University, revised Feb 2005.
    6. Ichiroh Daitoh & Nori Tarui, 2016. "Open-access Renewable Resources and Urban Unemployment: Dual Institutional Failures in a Small Open Economy," Keio-IES Discussion Paper Series 2016-009, Institute for Economics Studies, Keio University.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:bla:rdevec:v:1:y:1997:i:3:p:324-36. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Wiley-Blackwell Digital Licensing) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/journal.asp?ref=1363-6669 .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.