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Micro-credit programs and off-farm migration in China

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  • Hongbin Li
  • Scott Rozelle
  • Linxiu Zhang

Abstract

This paper seeks to evaluate effects of micro-credit projects on the poor. We utilize data that we collected in Sichuan Province in 1999 to investigate whether micro-credit projects have targeted the poor and whether participation in the micro-credit project increases the likelihood of migration and switching to off-farm jobs. We find that, although the micro-credit programs did not help increase assets of the participants, it did help to move one or more of their members into an off-farm job. Our findings indicate that there is a great deal of benefit in supporting micro-credit programs. Copyright 2004 Blackwell Publishing Ltd

Suggested Citation

  • Hongbin Li & Scott Rozelle & Linxiu Zhang, 2004. "Micro-credit programs and off-farm migration in China," Pacific Economic Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 9(3), pages 209-223, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:pacecr:v:9:y:2004:i:3:p:209-223
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    Cited by:

    1. Jing You & Samuel Annim, 2014. "The Impact of Microcredit on Child Education: Quasi-experimental Evidence from Rural China," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 50(7), pages 926-948, July.
    2. You, Jing, 2013. "The role of microcredit in older children’s nutrition: Quasi-experimental evidence from rural China," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 167-179.
    3. Wei Zhang & Haifeng Li & Shigenori Ishida & Eric Park, 2010. "China’s Non-governmental Microcredit Practice: History and Challenges," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, vol. 31(3), pages 280-296, September.
    4. Obike, Kingsley Chukwuemeka & Osundu, Charles Kelechi, 2013. "The Empirical Determinants of Cassava Farmers Access to Microfinance Services in Abia State Nigeria," MPRA Paper 63326, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Jia, Xiangping & Xiang, Cheng & Huang, Jikun, 2013. "Microfinance, self-employment, and entrepreneurs in less developed areas of rural China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 27(C), pages 94-103.
    6. Zhang, Guibin, 2008. "The choice of formal or informal finance: Evidence from Chengdu, China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 19(4), pages 659-678, December.
    7. Cull,Robert J. & Gan,Li & Gao,Nan & Xu,L. Colin, 2015. "Dual credit markets and household access to finance : evidence from a representative Chinese household survey," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7454, The World Bank.
    8. Fang, Hai & Eggleston, Karen N. & Rizzo, John A. & Zeckhauser, Richard Jay, 2010. "Female Employment and Fertility in Rural China," Scholarly Articles 4449097, Harvard Kennedy School of Government.

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