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Transitions from School to Work and the Early Labour Market Experience

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  • Bratberg, Espen
  • Nilsen, Oivind Anti

Abstract

We consider transitions from school to work and the early market experience. The duration of post-school unemployment, wages, and job duration are estimated simultaneously. We find that individuals with higher levels of schooling get jobs more quickly and have longer employment durations. Apprentices have shorter unemployment periods and stay longer in their jobs than others at the same educational level. Females have shorter unemployment periods and lower wages, and also stay in the first job longer. The unemployment duration and the accepted wage affect job duration positively, but the estimated covariance terms suggest unobserved factors working in the opposite direction. Copyright 2000 by Blackwell Publishing Ltd

Suggested Citation

  • Bratberg, Espen & Nilsen, Oivind Anti, 2000. " Transitions from School to Work and the Early Labour Market Experience," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 62(0), pages 909-929, Special I.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:obuest:v:62:y:2000:i:0:p:909-29
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:lan:wpaper:1023 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Bart Cockx & Matteo Picchio, 2013. "Scarring effects of remaining unemployed for long-term unemployed school-leavers," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 176(4), pages 951-980, October.
    3. OSHIO Takashi & INAGAKI Seiichi, 2014. "Does Initial Job Status Affect Midlife Outcomes and Mental Health? Evidence from a survey in Japan," Discussion papers 14025, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    4. J Taylor & A N Nguyen, 2003. "Transition from school to first job: the influence of educational attainment," Working Papers 540112, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
    5. Oshio, Takashi & Inagaki, Seiichi, 2013. "Does initial job status affect midlife outcomes and mental health? Evidence from a survey in Japan," CIS Discussion paper series 585, Center for Intergenerational Studies, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
    6. Jahn, Elke J. & Rosholm, Michael, 2014. "Looking beyond the bridge: The effect of temporary agency employment on labor market outcomes," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 65(C), pages 108-125.
    7. Blázquez, Maite, 2004. "Youth labour market integration in Spain: the connection between search time, job duration and skill-mismatch," UC3M Working papers. Economics we042106, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search

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