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New Men and New Women? A Comparison of Paid Work Propensities from a Panel Data Perspective

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  • Booth, Alison L
  • Jenkins, Stephen P
  • Serrano, Carlos Garcia

Abstract

The paper uses BHPS waves 1–5 (1991–5) to compare paid work participation rates of men and women. Year-on-year persistence in paid work propensities is high, but greater for men than women. Non-work persistence is higher for women. Using panel data probit regression models, the paper also investigates why men’s and women’s participation rates differ, comparing the roles of differences in observable characteristics and differences in rates of return to these characteristics, while also controlling for unobserved heterogeneity. Most of the difference in participation rates is accounted for by the differences in returns associated with the presence of children, especially young ones.
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  • Booth, Alison L & Jenkins, Stephen P & Serrano, Carlos Garcia, 1999. " New Men and New Women? A Comparison of Paid Work Propensities from a Panel Data Perspective," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 61(2), pages 167-197, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:obuest:v:61:y:1999:i:2:p:167-97
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Boheim, Rene & Taylor, Mark P., 2002. "The search for success: do the unemployed find stable employment?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 9(6), pages 717-735, December.
    2. Prowse, Victoria L., 2005. "State Dependence in a Multi-State Model of Employment Dynamics," IZA Discussion Papers 1623, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Ahn, Taehyun, 2012. "Employment Dynamics of Married Women and the Role of Part-time Work: the Case of Korea," Hitotsubashi Journal of Economics, Hitotsubashi University, vol. 53(1), pages 25-38, June.
    4. Victoria Prowse, 2012. "Modeling Employment Dynamics With State Dependence and Unobserved Heterogeneity," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 30(3), pages 411-431, April.
    5. Sara Connolly & Mary Gregory, 2010. "Dual tracks: part-time work in life-cycle employment for British women," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 23(3), pages 907-931, June.
    6. Audra J Bowlus & Louise Grogan, "undated". "Equilibrium Job Search and Gender Wage Differentials in the UK," Canadian International Labour Network Working Papers 48, McMaster University.
    7. Taehyun Ahn, 2010. "Employment Dynamics of Married Women and the Role of Part-Time Work: Evidence from Korea," Working Papers 1003, Research Institute for Market Economy, Sogang University.
    8. Richard Blundell & Mike Brewer & Marco Francesconi, 2005. "Job changes, hours changes and labour market flexibility: panel data evidence for Britain," IFS Working Papers W05/12, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    9. Patrizia Luongo, 2010. "Inequality of Opportunity in the Labour Market Entry of Graduates in Italy," SERIES 0030, Dipartimento di Economia e Finanza - Università degli Studi di Bari "Aldo Moro", revised May 2010.
    10. Victoria Prowse, 2005. "State Dependence in a Multi-state Model of Employment," Economics Papers 2005-W20, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
    11. Ludwig von Auer & Bettina Büttner, 2006. "Taxing the Labor Income of Spouses," Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics (JITE), Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 162(2), pages 291-308, June.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply
    • J6 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers

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