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Fiscal Incentives, European Integration and the Location of Foreign Direct Investment

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  • Hubert, Florence
  • Pain, Nigel

Abstract

Foreign direct investment in the European Economic Area (EEA) has grown rapidly in recent years. This paper tests for structural change in the geographical and industrial pattern of foreign direct investment in Europe using a panel data set on outward investment by German companies in the EEA since 1980. There is evidence of significant structural change since 1990, with nearly all locations and industries seeing a higher level of cross-border investment than might have been expected. We also investigate the scope for national governments to affect location choice through the use of fiscal instruments such as corporation taxes, investment in infrastructure and other forms of development grants and subsidies. The findings are mixed. Some measures, such as tax competitiveness, appear important but are sensitive to the specification of the model. However, the level of government fixed investment expenditure relative to that in other economies is found to have a significant positive impact, particularly in locations with less need for EU structural funds. Although the direct marginal impact appears relatively small, an additional finding of significant agglomeration forces suggests that fiscal policies could still have a permanent influence on the location of economic activities. Copyright 2002 by Blackwell Publishers Ltd and The Victoria University of Manchester

Suggested Citation

  • Hubert, Florence & Pain, Nigel, 2002. "Fiscal Incentives, European Integration and the Location of Foreign Direct Investment," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 70(3), pages 336-363, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:manchs:v:70:y:2002:i:3:p:336-63
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    Cited by:

    1. Alan J. Auerbach, 2003. "Fiscal Policy, Past and Present," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 34(1), pages 75-138.
    2. Gross, Dominique M. & Ryan, Michael, 2008. "FDI location and size: Does employment protection legislation matter?," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(6), pages 590-605, November.
    3. Alan J. Auerbach, 2002. "Is there a role for discretionary fiscal policy?," Proceedings - Economic Policy Symposium - Jackson Hole, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, pages 109-150.
    4. Bohl Martin T. & Mcdonald Frank & Tuselmann Heinz-josef & Voronkova Svitlana & Windrum Paul, 2011. "The German model of capitalism and the persistence of outward foreign direct investment: evidence from German manufacturing industries," Экономика региона, CyberLeninka;Федеральное государственное бюджетное учреждение науки «Институт экономики Уральского отделения Российской академии наук», issue 2, pages 119-125.
    5. Kamil Dybczak, 2006. "Generational Accounts in the Czech Republic," Working Papers 2006/2, Czech National Bank, Research Department.
    6. Menna, Khaled & Mehibel, Samer, 2018. "Les pays de l’Afrique du Nord et les IDE face à la problématique de l’attractivité
      [North African countries and FDI facing the issue of attractiveness]
      ," MPRA Paper 85559, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Nalin Kumar Ramaul & Pinki Ramaul, 2016. "Determinants of Industrial Location Choice in India: A Polychoric Principal Component Analysis Approach," Journal of Quantitative Economics, Springer;The Indian Econometric Society (TIES), vol. 14(1), pages 29-56, June.
    8. Rougé Jean-François & Chopov Borislav, 2016. "Hypercompetition & Fiscal Attractiveness," Economics, De Gruyter Open, vol. 4(2), pages 75-93, December.
    9. Conesa, Juan Carlos & Garriga, Carlos, 2013. "Intertemporal discounting and policy selection," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Mar, pages 165-180.
    10. Basile, Roberto & Castellani, Davide & Zanfei, Antonello, 2008. "Location choices of multinational firms in Europe: The role of EU cohesion policy," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(2), pages 328-340, March.
    11. Kotlikoff, Laurence J., 2002. "Generational policy," Handbook of Public Economics,in: A. J. Auerbach & M. Feldstein (ed.), Handbook of Public Economics, edition 1, volume 4, chapter 27, pages 1873-1932 Elsevier.
    12. Romualdas Ginevičius & Agnė Šimelytė, 2011. "Government incentives directed towards foreign direct investment: a case of central and eastern europe," Journal of Business Economics and Management, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 12(3), pages 435-450, May.
    13. James Banks & Carl Emmerson, 2000. "Public and private pension spending: principles, practice and the need for reform," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 21(1), pages 1-63, March.
    14. Jost, Thomas & Nunnenkamp, Peter, 2002. "Bestimmungsgründe deutscher Direktinvestitionen in Entwicklungs- und Reformländern: hat sich wirklich etwas verändert?," Kiel Working Papers 1124, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    15. Sebald,Alexander C. & Neubourg,Chris,de, 2003. "Paying for Pensions and Other Public Expenditures: Overtaxing our Children?," Research Memorandum 062, Maastricht University, Maastricht Research School of Economics of Technology and Organization (METEOR).
    16. Eich, Frank, 2010. "Who will pay? Inter-generational transfers and public sector pensions," EconStor Preprints 54558, ZBW - German National Library of Economics.

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