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Child Care Costs and Lone Mothers' Employment Rates: UK Evidence

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  • Jenkins, Stephen P
  • Symons, Elizabeth J

Abstract

The most commonly cited explanations for the low employment rates of British lone mothers are disincentives provided by the benefit system and a lack of suitable jobs or affordable childcare. This is the first British study focusing on lone mothers' employment rates that includes direct measures of childcare costs. Using data from the 1989 Lone Parents Survey, we find significant disincentive effects for child care costs, albeit of a smaller magnitude than in some related studies. There are also some novel findings about knowledge of the benefit system, and measures of human capital and financial stability and security. Copyright 2001 by Blackwell Publishers Ltd and The Victoria University of Manchester

Suggested Citation

  • Jenkins, Stephen P & Symons, Elizabeth J, 2001. "Child Care Costs and Lone Mothers' Employment Rates: UK Evidence," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 69(2), pages 121-147, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:manchs:v:69:y:2001:i:2:p:121-47
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    Cited by:

    1. Helmut Mahringer & Christine Zulehner, 2015. "Child-care costs and mothers’ employment rates: an empirical analysis for Austria," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 13(4), pages 837-870, December.
    2. Julia Bock-Schappelwein & Rainer Eppel & Ulrike Mühlberger, 2009. "Social Policy as a Productive Force," WIFO Monatsberichte (monthly reports), WIFO, vol. 82(11), pages 845-857, November.
    3. Daniela Del Boca & Daniela Vuri, 2007. "The mismatch between employment and child care in Italy: the impact of rationing," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 20(4), pages 805-832, October.
    4. Colm Harmon & Claire Finn & Arnaud Chevalier & Tarja Viitanen, 2006. "The economics of early childhood care and education : technical research paper for the National Economic and Social Forum," Open Access publications 10197/671, School of Economics, University College Dublin.
    5. Kaiser, Lutz C., 2006. "Female Labor Market Transitions in Europe," IZA Discussion Papers 2115, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Yin King Fok & Sung-Hee Jeon & Roger Wilkins, 2009. "Does Part-Time Employment Help or Hinder Lone Mothers Movements into Full-Time Employment?," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2009n25, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    7. Maria Concetta Chiuri, 1999. "Intra-Household Allocation of Time and Resources: Empirical Evidence on a Sample of Italian Households with Young Children," CSEF Working Papers 15, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy.
    8. Ghazala Naz, 2004. "The impact of cash-benefit reform on parents’ labour force participation," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 17(2), pages 369-383, June.
    9. Burstrom, Bo & Whitehead, Margaret & Clayton, Stephen & Fritzell, Sara & Vannoni, Francesca & Costa, Giuseppe, 2010. "Health inequalities between lone and couple mothers and policy under different welfare regimes - The example of Italy, Sweden and Britain," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 70(6), pages 912-920, March.
    10. Felix Büchel & C. Katharina Spieß, 2002. "Kindertageseinrichtungen und Müttererwerbstätigkeit: neue Erkenntnisse zu einem bekannten Zusammenhang," Vierteljahrshefte zur Wirtschaftsforschung / Quarterly Journal of Economic Research, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research, vol. 71(1), pages 95-113.
    11. Kirby, Simon & Riley, Rebecca, 2004. "Compulsory work-focused interviews for inactive benefit claimants: an evaluation of the British ONE pilots," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 11(4), pages 415-429, August.
    12. Y.E. Akgündüz & J. Plantenga, 2015. "Childcare Prices and Maternal Employment: a Meta-Analysis," Working Papers 15-14, Utrecht School of Economics.
    13. Monika Bütler, 2007. "Arbeiten lohnt sich nicht - ein zweites Kind noch weniger. Zu den Auswirkungen einkommensabhängiger Tarife auf das (Arbeitsmarkt-) Verhalten der Frauen," Perspektiven der Wirtschaftspolitik, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 8(1), pages 1-19, January.

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