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The Impact of Intelligence and Institutional Improvements on Economic Growth

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  • Weede, Erich
  • Kampf, Sebastian

Abstract

Standard indicators of human capital endowment--like literacy, school enrollment ratios or years of schooling--suffer from a number of defects. They are crude. Mostly, they refer to input rather than output measures of human capital formation. Occasionally, they produce implausible effects. They are not robustly significant determinants of growth. Here, they are replaced by average intelligence. This variable consistently outperforms the other human capital indicators in spite of suffering from severe defects of its own. The immediate impact of institutional improvements, i.e., more government tolerance of private enterprise or economic freedom, on growth it is in the same order of magnitude as intelligence effects are. Copyright 2002 by WWZ and Helbing & Lichtenhahn Verlag AG

Suggested Citation

  • Weede, Erich & Kampf, Sebastian, 2002. "The Impact of Intelligence and Institutional Improvements on Economic Growth," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(3), pages 361-380.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:kyklos:v:55:y:2002:i:3:p:361-80
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    References listed on IDEAS

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