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What Happened to the Neanderthals? The Survival Trap


  • Faria, Joao Ricardo


This paper proposes a model that unifies and integrates four conjectures put forward to explain the extinction of the Neanderthals. The model shows that these hypotheses, considered together or individually, are not sufficient to guarantee the extinction of the Neanderthals. Moreover, a survival trap related to the economic incentives of Homo sapiens' migration is essential to explain the fate of the Neanderthals. Copyright 2000 by WWZ and Helbing & Lichtenhahn Verlag AG

Suggested Citation

  • Faria, Joao Ricardo, 2000. "What Happened to the Neanderthals? The Survival Trap," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 53(2), pages 161-172.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:kyklos:v:53:y:2000:i:2:p:161-72

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Krueger, Alan B & Summers, Lawrence H, 1988. "Efficiency Wages and the Inter-industry Wage Structure," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 56(2), pages 259-293, March.
    2. William T. Dickens & Lawrence F. Katz, 1987. "Inter-Industry Wage Differences and Theories of Wage Determination," NBER Working Papers 2271, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. William T. Dickens, 1986. "Wages, Employment and the Threat of Collective Action by Workers," NBER Working Papers 1856, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Edin, Per-Anders & Zetterberg, Johnny, 1992. "Interindustry Wage Differentials: Evidence from Sweden and a Comparison with the United States," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(5), pages 1341-1349, December.
    5. Zweimuller, Josef, 1992. "Survey non-response and biases in wage regressions," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 105-109, May.
    6. Winter-Ebmer, Rudolf, 1994. "Endogenous Growth, Human Capital, and Industry Wages," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(4), pages 289-314, October.
    7. Alan B. Krueger & Lawrence H. Summers, 1986. "Reflections on the Inter-Industry Wage Structure," NBER Working Papers 1968, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Wagner, Joachim, 1990. "An international comparison of sector wage differentials," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 34(1), pages 93-97, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Berck, Peter & Levy, Amnon & Chowdhury, Khorshed, 2012. "An analysis of the world's environment and population dynamics with varying carrying capacity, concerns and skepticism," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(C), pages 103-112.
    2. Lagerl F, Nils-Petter, 2007. "Long-Run Trends In Human Body Mass," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 11(03), pages 367-387, June.

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