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'Dinkies' and Housewives: The Regulation of Shopping Hours

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  • Thum, Marcel
  • Weichenrieder, Alfons

Abstract

The idea of deregulating shopping hours brings strong opposition from many groups in the society. Surprisingly, even many consumers oppose deregulation. This paper rationalizes this behavior by considering heterogeneous consumers who differ in their earnings abilities. If a majority of families has two income earners, long open hours become essential and the regulation of shopping hours tends to be eliminated. If most families are single income households, the regulation may be imposed in order to keep prices low. Taking the repercussions on the labor supply decision into account, multiple equilibria can be explained. Copyright 1997 by WWZ and Helbing & Lichtenhahn Verlag AG

Suggested Citation

  • Thum, Marcel & Weichenrieder, Alfons, 1997. "'Dinkies' and Housewives: The Regulation of Shopping Hours," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 50(4), pages 539-559.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:kyklos:v:50:y:1997:i:4:p:539-59
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Hoffmann, Johannes & Homburg, Stefan, 1990. "Explaining the Rise and Decline of the Dollar," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 43(1), pages 53-68.
    2. Meese, Richard, 1990. "Currency Fluctuations in the Post-Bretton Woods Era," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 4(1), pages 117-134, Winter.
    3. Menkhoff, Lukas, 1991. "Explaining the Rise and Decline of the Dollar: A Note," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 44(3), pages 445-450.
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    Cited by:

    1. Tobias Wenzel, 2010. "Liberalization of Opening Hours with Free Entry," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 11, pages 511-526, November.
    2. Elbert Dijkgraaf & Raymond Gradus, 2007. "Explaining Sunday Shop Policies," De Economist, Springer, pages 207-219.
    3. Kosfeld, Michael, 2002. "Why shops close again: An evolutionary perspective on the deregulation of shopping hours," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 46(1), pages 51-72, January.
    4. Jacobsen, Joyce P. & Kooreman, Peter, 2005. "Timing constraints and the allocation of time: The effects of changing shopping hours regulations in The Netherlands," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 49(1), pages 9-27, January.
    5. Michael C Burda & Philippe Weil, 2004. "Blue Laws," Working Papers hal-01065499, HAL.
    6. Michael Burda, 2000. "Product Market Regulation and Labor Market Outcomes: How can Deregulation Create Jobs?," CESifo Working Paper Series 230, CESifo Group Munich.
    7. E. Dijkgraaf & R.H.J.M. Gradus, 2006. "Deregulating Sunday Shop Policies," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 06-003/3, Tinbergen Institute.
    8. repec:spo:wpecon:info:hdl:2441/8843 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Shy, Oz & Stenbacka, Rune, 2006. "Service hours with asymmetric distributions of ideal service time," International Journal of Industrial Organization, Elsevier, vol. 24(4), pages 763-771, July.

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