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Metropolitan Concentration in Developing Countries

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  • Petrakos, George
  • Brada, Josef C

Abstract

The authors examine the economic, political, and cultural determinants of urban concentrations using a sample of fifty-three countries. As countries develop, the largest city's share of the population at first increases and then decreases. Foreign investment's influence on concentration also depends on the level of the development. Political and cultural factors, such as lack of democracy, government instability, and homogeneous population, all contribute to high levels of urban concentration. For many developing countries, these noneconomic factors have led to cities whose size far exceeds what would be justified by economic considerations. Copyright 1989 by WWZ and Helbing & Lichtenhahn Verlag AG

Suggested Citation

  • Petrakos, George & Brada, Josef C, 1989. "Metropolitan Concentration in Developing Countries," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 42(4), pages 557-578.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:kyklos:v:42:y:1989:i:4:p:557-78
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gary S. Becker, 1974. "Crime and Punishment: An Economic Approach," NBER Chapters,in: Essays in the Economics of Crime and Punishment, pages 1-54 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Demsetz, Harold, 1969. "Information and Efficiency: Another Viewpoint," Journal of Law and Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 12(1), pages 1-22, April.
    3. Andrei Shleifer, 2004. "Does Competition Destroy Ethical Behavior?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(2), pages 414-418, May.
    4. Bruno S. Frey, 2004. "Dealing with Terrorism – Stick or Carrot?," Books, Edward Elgar Publishing, number 3435, April.
    5. Anthony Downs, 1957. "An Economic Theory of Political Action in a Democracy," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 65, pages 135-135.
    6. Shleifer, Andrei, 2000. "Inefficient Markets: An Introduction to Behavioral Finance," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198292272.
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    Cited by:

    1. Andrés Rodríguez-Pose & Roberto Ezcurra, 2010. "Does decentralization matter for regional disparities? A cross-country analysis," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 10(5), pages 619-644, September.
    2. George Petrakos & Andres Rodríguez-Pose & Antonis Rovolis, 2003. "Growth, Integration and Regional Inequality in Europe," ERSA conference papers ersa03p46, European Regional Science Association.
    3. Kandogan, Yener, 2014. "The effect of foreign trade and investment liberalization on spatial concentration of economic activity," International Business Review, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 648-659.
    4. Chang, Gene Hsin & Brada, Josef C., 2006. "The paradox of China's growing under-urbanization," Economic Systems, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 24-40, March.
    5. Josef C. Brada & Ali M. Kutan & Taner M. Yigit, 2004. "The Effects of Transition and Political Instability On Foreign Direct Investment Inflows: Central Europe and the Balkans," William Davidson Institute Working Papers Series wp729, William Davidson Institute at the University of Michigan.
    6. Vassilis Monastiriotis, 2007. "Patterns of spatial association and their persistence across socio-economic indicators: the case of the Greek regions," GreeSE – Hellenic Observatory Papers on Greece and Southeast Europe 05, Hellenic Observatory, LSE.

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