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Enhancing Industry Association Theory: A Comparative Business History Contribution

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  • James Reveley
  • Simon Ville

Abstract

Our comparative business historical examination of industry associations aims to enrich the under-theorized study of this distinctive type of meta-organization. We compare two New Zealand industry associations operating in the same supply chain but with differing degrees of associative capacity and types of external architecture. Our analysis of these associations builds on two strands of theory that rarely communicate with each other: New Institutional Economics (NIE) and Organizational-Institutional Theory (OIT). We demonstrate how NIE describes the structural potentialities for associational strength, while OIT addresses the relational context within associations. In turn, NIE's examination of external influences reinforces OIT suggestions that associations which are rich in social capital can become developmental in orientation. Our historical analysis supplies fresh theoretical insights into industry associations, thereby addressing conceptual issues of interest to management scholars who study bridging-type organizations. On this basis, we argue that business history and organization studies complement each other. Copyright (c) 2010 The Authors. Journal compilation (c) 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd and Society for the Advancement of Management Studies.

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  • James Reveley & Simon Ville, 2010. "Enhancing Industry Association Theory: A Comparative Business History Contribution," Journal of Management Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(s1), pages 837-858, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:jomstd:v:47:y:2010:i:s1:p:837-858
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Mary O'Sullivan & Margaret B. W. Graham, 2010. "Guest Editors' Introduction," Journal of Management Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 47(s1), pages 775-790, July.
    2. De Villa, Maria A. & Rajwani, Tazeeb & Lawton, Thomas, 2015. "Market entry modes in a multipolar world: Untangling the moderating effect of the political environment," International Business Review, Elsevier, vol. 24(3), pages 419-429.
    3. David Thomas & Ginalski Stéphanie & Mach André & Rebmann Frédéric, 2010. "Networks of Coordination: Swiss Business Associations as an Intermediary between Business, Politics and Administration during the 20th Century," Business and Politics, De Gruyter, vol. 11(4), pages 1-40, January.
    4. König, Andreas & Schulte, Martin & Enders, Albrecht, 2012. "Inertia in response to non-paradigmatic change: The case of meta-organizations," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 41(8), pages 1325-1343.

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